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IS there a any song or poem that is about "Change in our lives" In how we mature,...

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nhl123 | Student, Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted May 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM via web

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IS there a any song or poem that is about "Change in our lives" In how we mature, realize what's right, what's wrong, our tastes, and social life?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 11, 2012 at 1:35 PM (Answer #2)

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I hope you don't mind an oldie but goldie, but David Bowie's "Changes" immediately came to mind. Although it's primarily about Bowie's own maturation in the music world, the lyrics can still be interpreted in many different ways.

I still don't know what I was waiting for
And my time was running wild
A million dead-end streets
Every time I thought I'd got it made
It seemed the taste was not so sweet
So I turned myself to face me
But I've never caught a glimpse
Of how the others must see the faker
I'm much too fast to take that test

Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
(Turn and face the strain)
Ch-ch-Changes
Don't want to be a richer man
Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
(Turn and face the strain)
Ch-ch-Changes
Just gonna have to be a different man
Time may change me
But I can't trace time

I watch the ripples change their size
But never leave the stream
Of warm impermanence and
So the days float through my eyes
But still the days seem the same
And these children that you spit on
As they try to change their worlds
Are immune to your consultations
They're quite aware of what they're going through

Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
(Turn and face the strain)
Ch-ch-Changes
Don't tell t hem to grow up and out of it
Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
(Turn and face the strain)
Ch-ch-Changes
Where's your shame
You've left us up to our necks in it
Time may change me
But you can't trace time

Strange fascination, fascinating me
Changes are taking the pace I'm going through

Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
(Turn and face the strain)
Ch-ch-Changes
Oh, look out you rock 'n rollers
Ch-ch-ch-ch-Changes
(Turn and face the strain)
Ch-ch-Changes
Pretty soon you're gonna get a little older
Time may change me
But I can't trace time
I said that time may change me
But I can't trace time

http://www.elyrics.net/read/d/david-bowie-lyrics/changes-lyrics.html

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 11, 2012 at 4:11 PM (Answer #3)

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As a parent I am often haunted by Cats in The Cradle by Harry Chapin.  It tells the story of a dad who's son idolizes him and wants to spend time with the dad.  As the song continues, the dad is constantly too busy to be a part of the child's life.  Once the child grows up and has his own life, the dad realizes the mistakes he has made when his son never has time for the father. 

http://www.lyricsdepot.com/harry-chapin/cats-in-the-cradle.html

 

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e-martin | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 11, 2012 at 4:35 PM (Answer #4)

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The first poem that comes to my mind is "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock", T.S. Eliot's famous work. This is a poem about looking forward to the changes that life brings, wondering about them, and taking a somewhat pessimistic view of what the aging process does to one's sense of possibility. 

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 11, 2012 at 4:57 PM (Answer #5)

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I thought of a song called "This One's for the Girls" by Martina McBride.  Although it refers to girls and the changes in girls' lives, many of them can be applied to men too.

Here's a link to the lyrics:

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/martinamcbride/thisonesforthegirls.html

 

The song describes a girl's life at 13, 25 and 42 years old and what changes.  At 13, the perils of high school are described.  At 25, the difficulty of getting a life started and hopes for the future.  At 42, grief for lost youth but recognition for accomplishmet.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 11, 2012 at 5:25 PM (Answer #6)

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For a poem, how about AE Housman's "When I was One and Twenty?"  That's about getting wiser in the course of a year or so.  For songs, from the past there's Bruce Springsteen's "Glory Days" and John Cougar's "Jack and Diane."  For the present there's Taylor Swift's "Fifteen" and "Never Grow Up."

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM (Answer #7)

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Marge Piercy's poem "Barbie Doll" comments upon the fixation of being thin and the pressures upon females to be pretty.  Its shocking message is a reminder of the frivolous, but often devastating, importance placed upon conforming to accepted views of beauty.

This girlchild was born as usual
and presented dolls that did pee-pee
and miniature GE stoves and irons
and wee lipsticks the color of cherry candy.
Then in the magic of puberty, a classmate said:
You have a great big nose and fat legs.

She was healthy, tested intelligent,
possessed strong arms and back,
abundant sexual drive and manual dexterity.
She went to and fro apologizing.
Everyone saw a fat nose on thick legs.

She was advised to play coy,
exhorted to come on hearty,
exercise, diet, smile and wheedle.
Her good nature wore out
like a fan belt.
So she cut off her nose and her legs
and offered them up.

In the casket displayed on satin she lay
with the undertaker's cosmetics painted on,
a turned-up putty nose,
dressed in a pink and white nightie.
Doesn't she look pretty? everyone said.
Consummation at last.
To every woman a happy ending.

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rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 11, 2012 at 7:00 PM (Answer #8)

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Again, apologies for pulling out an oldie, but an obvious choice would be "The Times They are A Changin'" by Bob Dylan. To some extent it is about changes in society, but it is also links people's happiness to how successfully they adapt to them. The music may sound dated to young twenty-first century listeners (I know from experience, having tried to use it in a US history class) but the lyrics could hardly be more radical:

Come gather 'round people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You'll be drenched to the bone
If your time to you
Is worth savin'
Then you better start swimmin'
Or you'll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin'.

Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won't come again
And don't speak too soon
For the wheel's still in spin
And there's no tellin' who
That it's namin'
For the loser now
Will be later to win
For the times they are a-changin'.

Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don't stand in the doorway
Don't block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There's a battle outside
And it is ragin'
It'll soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin'.

Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don't criticize
What you can't understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is
Rapidly agin'
Please get out of the new one
If you can't lend your hand
For the times they are a-changin'.

The line it is drawn
The curse it is cast
The slow one now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past
The order is
Rapidly fadin'
And the first one now
Will later be last
For the times they are a-changin'.

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 11, 2012 at 8:02 PM (Answer #9)

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What about Five For Fighting's song "100 Years"? It discusses how one's perspective changes as he journeys through life. The lyrics are below:

"100 Years"

I'm 15 for a moment
Caught in between 10 and 20
And I'm just dreaming
Counting the ways to where you are
I'm 22 for a moment
She feels better than ever
And we're on fire
Making our way back from Mars
15 there's still time for you
Time to buy and time to lose
15, there's never a wish better than this
When you only got 100 years to live
I'm 33 for a moment
Still the man, but you see I'm a they
A kid on the way
A family on my mind
I'm 45 for a moment
The sea is high
And I'm heading into a crisis
Chasing the years of my life
15 there's still time for you
Time to buy, Time to lose yourself
Within a morning star
15 I'm all right with you
15, there's never a wish better than this
When you only got 100 years to live
Half time goes by
Suddenly you’re wise
Another blink of an eye
67 is gone
The sun is getting high
We're moving on...
I'm 99 for a moment
Dying for just another moment
And I'm just dreaming
Counting the ways to where you are
15 there's still time for you
22 I feel her too
33 you’re on your way
Every day's a new day...
15 there's still time for you
Time to buy and time to choose
Hey 15, there's never a wish better than this
When you only got 100 years to live.
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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 15, 2012 at 4:10 AM (Answer #10)

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One of my favorite poems (which I appreciate all the more as I get older) is called, "Turning Thirty." It is all about the changes we go through—the stages of our lives when we look at the world, ourselves, and our place within the world that change. My favorite image is...

...it’s an ominous note
that the Indian skirts flapping on the sidewalk racks
last summer looked so gay you wanted them all
but now are marked clearer than price tags: not for you.

The imagery in this poem is excellent. Whenever I see those Indian skirts somewhere, I always stop to look and over say to myself, "not for you." Hope you enjoy it. (I've pasted the poem and provided the URL address as well.)

Turning Thirty

This spring, you’d swear it actually gets dark earlier. 
At the elegant new restaurants downtown
your married friends lock glances over the walnut torte: 
it’s ten o’clock. The have important jobs
and go to bed before midnight. Only you
walking alone up the dazzling avenue
still feel a girl’s excitement, for the thousandth time
you enter your life as though for the first time, 
as an immigrant enters a huge, mysterious capital: 
Paris, New York. So many wide plazas, so many marble addresses! 
Home, you write feverishly
in all five notebooks at once, then faint into bed
dazed with ambition and too many cigarettes.

Well, what’s wrong with that? Nothing, except
really you don’t believe wrinkles mean character
and know it’s an ominous note
that the Indian skirts flapping on the sidewalk racks
last summer looked so gay you wanted them all
but now are marked clearer than price tags: not for you. 
Oh, what were you doing, why weren’t you paying attention
that piercingly blue day, not a cloud in the sky, 
when suddenly “choices” 
ceased to mean “infinite possibilities” 
and became instead “deciding what to do without”? 
No wonder you’re happiest now
riding on trains from one lover to the next. 
In those black, night-mirrored windows
a wild white face, operatic, still enthralls you: 
a romantic heroine, 
suspended between lives, suspended between destinations.

                                          -- Katha Pollitt

URL:

http://blog.bestamericanpoetry.com/the_best_american_poetry/2009/08/turning-thirty.html

And for a song, Billy Joel has several. One is "Scenes from an Italian Restaurant." Another is "The Great Suburban Showdown."

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