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Tell-Tale HeartHow many schools are doing the Tell-Tale Heart and The Red Room? These...

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easytiga | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 26, 2008 at 5:24 AM via web

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Tell-Tale Heart

How many schools are doing the Tell-Tale Heart and The Red Room? These are two Gothic stories, and I'm stuck on my coursework. Can anyone help me?

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houston-luvr | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted November 26, 2008 at 9:27 AM (Answer #2)

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i don't know how many schools are reading those books,but my school just got through reading tell tale heart and the raven. and i'm only in 8th grade

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beauty4ashes12000 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted November 26, 2008 at 9:27 AM (Answer #3)

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I just finished teaching "The Tell-Tale Heart" by E.A. Poe to my eighth graders. What do you need help with?

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pward55 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) eNoter

Posted November 26, 2008 at 9:27 AM (Answer #4)

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"The Tale-Tell Heart" is a short story in our Reading books.  I have already read the story to my students, discussed and we have tested on it.  I want them to experience Edgar Allen Poe in so many ways.  I teach 8th grade and they loved it.  It was short, a horror story, invoked many questions from the students ('what happened to the blood?", "why did he tell on himself?").  It also started their creative juices to flow.  They are now writing a short skit - adding their own flavor in parts they questioned.  Each group will present a part of the story in dramatic form.  I am getting many of my standards expressed in this effort.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted November 26, 2008 at 9:27 AM (Answer #5)

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Whenever one reads narratives in a certain genre, the first step is to understand the components of this genre.  Then, the reader can identify them in the narrative as she/he reads and rereads.  Gothic has (1) an atmosphere of dread and menace, its (2) setting is usually a mansion, cathedral, or some other architecture with dark passageways and mystery about it, (3) there is an element of grotesque:  a deformed character (physically or mentally or morally).  These elements all contribute to the horror of the tale. 

You may wish to research the term gothic more and check out the questions and answers on enotes as there have been several questions on Poe's works.  Below is the site for one question that deals with a Gothic element in "Tell-Tale Heart."

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ellieboots | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 27, 2008 at 7:39 AM (Answer #7)

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and is there a "The red Room" group where i can ask specific questiona about the red room? or can anybody tell me How the directions given to the red room build suspense and tension??

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ellieboots | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 27, 2008 at 7:53 AM (Answer #6)

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I am comparing the tell tale heart and the red room! i need to know some ways how H.G Wells and Edgar Allen Poe make their stories tense and eerie!

Can anyone help me please!!

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 30, 2008 at 5:43 AM (Answer #9)

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted July 14, 2010 at 2:11 AM (Answer #10)

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There is a great version of the story performed by Vincent Price at these youtube links

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2LNjgv5p3Ek

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TM-tAb-bM-s&feature=related

My students really appreciated the insanity of the narrator through this excellent performance.

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sssserr | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted June 7, 2011 at 5:35 AM (Answer #11)

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So bear with broken drop down menus for a little while and we'll work on getting the patched up. google3.

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