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Teaching ReadingAny tips for teaching reading to middle school students with cognitive...

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wayfarer374 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 17, 2008 at 7:02 AM via web

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Teaching Reading

Any tips for teaching reading to middle school students with cognitive disabilities? I have a student I am tutoring who really struggles to remember lessons from session to session. He is in seventh grade but at a very basic reading level. I would really like to help him gain confidence with reading this year. He is very artistic and I would like to play on that with our lessons. Any ideas?

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morrol | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted December 17, 2008 at 2:14 PM (Answer #2)

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Repetition is key when dealing with students that have difficulty reading. Find a short text that the student likes, and read it every day. Point out new things about the text everyday, but stick with the same text. After awhile, when the text itself is no longer being learned, the content can be discussed. Then increase difficulty.

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lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted December 17, 2008 at 4:29 PM (Answer #3)

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Search out some high interest/low level books.  One of the problems with teaching reading to that age group is that they don't want to look like they are reading books for young children. Your librarian may be able to help, if you don't have a literacy coach or a resource center.

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jennifer-taubenheim | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted December 17, 2008 at 7:04 PM (Answer #4)

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Teaching Reading

Any tips for teaching reading to middle school students with cognitive disabilities? I have a student I am tutoring who really struggles to remember lessons from session to session. He is in seventh grade but at a very basic reading level. I would really like to help him gain confidence with reading this year. He is very artistic and I would like to play on that with our lessons. Any ideas?

I have an 8th grade student who is reading on a 2nd grade level. One of the best things that I have found for him is the Magic Treehouse series. Also, there are some newer Choose-Your-Own-Adventure books with nice pictures that are pretty good. If you find any other that work, please share. If you are trying to play on his artistic talents, maybe you could have him draw a picture or create a comic strip of what he reads about as an assignment.

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cburr | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted February 15, 2009 at 12:12 PM (Answer #5)

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Has this student received any structured remediation along the lines of Orton Gillingham?  An 8th grade student reading at a 2nd grade level is not going to make much progress only from shared reading.  It sounds like he needs some real structured, sequential work with phonemic awareness, syllable structure, etc.

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slcteacher | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 7, 2009 at 11:03 AM (Answer #6)

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Teaching Reading

Any tips for teaching reading to middle school students with cognitive disabilities? I have a student I am tutoring who really struggles to remember lessons from session to session. He is in seventh grade but at a very basic reading level. I would really like to help him gain confidence with reading this year. He is very artistic and I would like to play on that with our lessons. Any ideas?

What reading series are you using?  I currently using SRA Reading Mastery Plus with my deaf students.  It is a very scripted, repetitive series that enhances vocabulary, literature, spelling, comprehension, and has a lot of useful ideas for the difficult reader.  There are also ideas for cross-curricular lessons.  Check out the SRA website for more information.

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drgingerbear | College Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted March 9, 2009 at 5:09 PM (Answer #7)

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I currently teach students with significant deficits in reading. In my 15 years of teaching students with cognitive disabilities, I have found that just getting them to like to read was half of the battle. Once students are hooked on reading, they tend to read more. Research indicates that the more a student reads, the better a reader they become. My students are in the 9th grade and are reading on a 1st – 4th grade level. There are some wonderful resources for remedial teachers that engage teen readers without making them feel badly.

Resource #1: Scholastic magazines

http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/classmags.asp?listby=3&catid=3

I use these with my students. It reinforces spelling, grammar, reading, and comprehension skills. You get one set per month and a teachers guide with reproducible. My classes have awesome conversations, debates, and spelling challenges based on these magazines. The price is not too bad. However, I contacted several businesses and asked if they would like to sponsor a student and within a week, I was able to purchase 30 copies for my students.

Resource #2: Orca books

http://www.orcabook.com/showproducts.cfm?FullCat=44

Orca Soundings is a series of high interest/low level reading books that are specifically written for teenagers. The kids loved them and begged or more. Some students even said that they were “beginning to like to read” because the books were interesting.

Happy Reading!

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lizkearney | Middle School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 17, 2009 at 12:14 PM (Answer #8)

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I agree with the others about Orca Publishers and the Magic Treehouse series. For children who are more cognitively delayed, the Magic Treehouse series may be more appropriate. For those students who are mature, kind of streetwise, etc., the Orca Publishers are fantastic. My classroom has changed dramatically by using these books!

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pswilson63 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 27, 2010 at 11:17 AM (Answer #9)

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In reply to #1 and #6, I have used the SRA Reading Mastery Program for the past 9 years.  I have found it to be a very good program, but I wouldn't recommend it for an eighth grade student.  The stories and pictures in the series are really geared towards younger students and I can't see an eighth grader accepting this.  However, SRA has a similar program called Corrective Reading that is geared towards older students with reading impairments.  It is a scripted program and very structured.  The lessons repeat elements from previous lessons, so this may be helpful to your student who is having difficulty retaining instruction.

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suekimmet | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 13, 2010 at 9:42 AM (Answer #10)

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I currently teach students with significant deficits in reading. In my 15 years of teaching students with cognitive disabilities, I have found that just getting them to like to read was half of the battle. Once students are hooked on reading, they tend to read more. Research indicates that the more a student reads, the better a reader they become. My students are in the 9th grade and are reading on a 1st – 4th grade level. There are some wonderful resources for remedial teachers that engage teen readers without making them feel badly.

Resource #1: Scholastic magazines

http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/classmags.asp?listby=3&catid=3

I use these with my students. It reinforces spelling, grammar, reading, and comprehension skills. You get one set per month and a teachers guide with reproducible. My classes have awesome conversations, debates, and spelling challenges based on these magazines. The price is not too bad. However, I contacted several businesses and asked if they would like to sponsor a student and within a week, I was able to purchase 30 copies for my students.

Resource #2: Orca books

http://www.orcabook.com/showproducts.cfm?FullCat=44

Orca Soundings is a series of high interest/low level reading books that are specifically written for teenagers. The kids loved them and begged or more. Some students even said that they were “beginning to like to read” because the books were interesting.

Happy Reading!

  I teach special ed. at the high school level.  Obviously most of my students, but especially the boys, come to me with the idea that they can't read and hate school.  I have used the Orca and Magic Treehouse book with great success, but a phenomena has occurred this year that I think some of you may be interested in.  I read the Percy Jackson books last summer and was excited to share them with my students.  I began by reading book one aloud (and repeating it during the day since I teach reading 5 times daily because of our odd scheduling...).  After the kids were hooked, I would tell the kids that I had something I needed to do (always true) and that they should read until I finished.  Eventually when I was busy or during a study hall they would ask to read the book.  And the next, and the next!  I've never seen any of them so excited about anything before.  In addition, we had great conversations about Greek mythology and where they had come across it before.  We did research on the internet, made posters and wrote stories.  Wow!!!  I only hope I can find something to follow up with next year.  I'd really like to keep the momentum and see how far we can go.  I cannot wait for my end-of-year reading tests. 

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted April 15, 2010 at 8:59 PM (Answer #11)

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Does your student enjoy stories? i recently discovered with one of my reluctant readers that he was frustrated as he 'never got to know the story'. He was resding aloud, trying so hard to decode words and use cues appropriately, that the 'fun' of the story was lost. We made an agreement thet we would have me read a book aloud with him following, then he would read it once we had finished. Because there was recall of the story, some of the stress of decoding was taken away. We have decided we'd like to read some books based on films - Penguin do a series of these in quick-read format.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 24, 2011 at 9:17 AM (Answer #13)

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Have him keep a notebook. He can record the tips, and any other information you want him to remember. The notebook will give him something to refer back to.

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