Teaching jobsWhere are all of the teaching jobs in the country? I work in Seattle which is void of all teaching positions. Is the job market in Las Vegas still booming, or did the housing collapse...

Teaching jobs

Where are all of the teaching jobs in the country? I work in Seattle which is void of all teaching positions. Is the job market in Las Vegas still booming, or did the housing collapse take the jobs with it? Where are there actually jobs?

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ginnylynn's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

There are several websites you can go to in order to see what teaching jobs are out there. Try the Nevada State Department of Education http://www.doe.nv.gov/ or any other state you are interested in. Google the State Department of Education. Also, I have found that there are many online opportunities to teach courses or to tutor--Sylvan online and University of Phoenix were looking for online instructors not too long ago. There are a couple of lists you can look at too- Craigslist.com and monsterjobs.com. I hope this helps.

amy-lepore's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #3)

If you're not completely set on teaching in the US, and you have your master's degree, you could consider teaching English as a Foreign Language in other countries. There were no jobs when I completed my MA, so I did this the year I graduated with my master's in Literature.  It was an amazing experience!  You truly learn to appreciate things when you've seen the world through the eyes of others.  You can do this if you don't have your master's, also, but the job offerings aren't as nice.  You will be able to teach on the college level with a master's; without an upper-level degree, you are able to work in private academies, etc. (unless you get a DOD job at an American school on foreign soil).  Their rules are a little different at the private academies, so be sure to read the fine print and get everything in writing!  Check out the links below:






Good Luck!

engtchr5's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #4)

One site that a lot of districts have turned to is http://www.teachers-teachers.com.

A whole host of Florida school districts are using this site as a recruiting tool and job board. Best wishes on your search!

slchanmo1885's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #5)

Unfortunately most of the teaching jobs are in hard-to-teach areas like inner cities or poverty stricken areas. I know of many young teachers who have worked in the city in order to find a job, and these are often very difficult environments to work in. I have heard that some Southern states like Florida need teachers, and have a few classmates who moved down there in order to take a position. Until then, you can consider working as a substitute or taking a support position in a school -- that way you can break into the system and have better luck getting hired for a teacher position when one opens up. Its tough out there right now with the economy in the state that its in, but hopefully things will pick up soon. I wish you the best of luck in your job search.

morrol's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #6)

Thank you engtchr5. That website is great. It is such a shame that there are so many good teachers out there, and so few jobs. Hopefully things will get better soon.

kwoo1213's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #7)

I hope you find something soon that suits you. :)  It is such a rewarding career!  We have lots of teaching jobs in and around my area of the country (NC) right now...there is a teaching shortage, but the state budget is so bad right now that they have had to limit hiring.

jennyrocks's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #8)

You also will want to check with your local Regional Office of Education. In Illinois, we have the Illinois Job bank and Iowa has a comparable website where schools will post their open position. Also checking the individual school sites will also have an open-positions link in the human resources tab (generally). I had sent out so many copies of my resume when I first started that I think that is why that was the ONE year the post office didn't raise their rates...haha. It takes a while in some areas so don't get discouraged. Where I am, it generally takes about four years of subbing to finally find a teaching position. I was lucky and found one after a year.

Keep at it! it will come.

afi80fl's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #9)

While it's not at all ideal, if you're willing to deal with the behavioral nightmare and the unending feelings of despair, urban school districts (namely Baltimore, Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, and DC) are always on the look-out for their next victim, I mean, employee. 

I can share that I began my teaching career working in the heart of the ghetto in Baltimore, Maryland.  My students hailed from the most empoverished of neighborhoods, and brought with them a myriad of social, emotional, and financial problems which constantly prevented them from focusing entirely on their academics.  While it was very difficult, and I thought about quitting more times than I can imagine, it did get me in the door.  Not to mention, if you can survive an environment where children roam the hallways playing with fire extinguishers, spraypainting classroom doors with gang symbols, smoking various forms of drugs in the restrooms, and cursing teachers as if they were dogs rather than professional, degree-holding educators, you can go anywhere else and FLOURISH!

There are also some financial advantages to working in Title I, urban schools; federal student loan forgiveness is just one of them!  Now, if you want to get a look at the absolute worst a school can get, check out "Hard Times and Douglass High", an HBO Documentary of my very first school.  I was there when it was filmed, and let me tell you... even if what you see makes you want to cry, you've only seen the tip of the iceberg.

mz-nay1's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #10)



mz-nay1's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #11)

i agree

litteacher8's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #12)

In California, there is a web site called enjoin which lists basically all of the jobs.  I have also noticed a lot fo jobs posted on Craigslist.  Other job sites are used too, of course.  The best way to get a job is to try to find one locally.  If you relocate for a job, there is no guarantee that you are keeping it.

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