In T. S. Eliot's "Preludes," what are some examples of assonance, alliteration, and consonance?What about the meaning of the poem?  Some people say it is about prostitution, but I am not sure. ...

In T. S. Eliot's "Preludes," what are some examples of assonance, alliteration, and consonance?

What about the meaning of the poem?  Some people say it is about prostitution, but I am not sure.  It sounds more like a troubled normal life in the modern era.

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Here's stanza I:

The winter evening settles down 
With smell of steaks in passageways. 
Six o'clock. 
The burnt-out ends of smoky days. 
And now a gusty shower wraps 
The grimy scraps 
Of withered leaves about your feet 
And newspapers from vacant lots; 
The showers beat 
On broken blinds and chimneypots, 
And at the corner of the street 
A lonely cab-horse steams and stamps. 
And then the lighting of the lamps.

Alliteration: "broken blinds," "lighting of the lamps."

Assonance: "leaves about your feet," "now a gusty shower"

Consonance: "steams and stamps"

Sibilance: "steaks in passagewaysSix o'clock."

End-rhyme: "stamps" / "lamps"

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