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Symbolism in "The Kite Runner"n "The Kite Runner", what is the symbolism of...

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bloomntnf | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 26, 2008 at 1:20 PM via web

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Symbolism in "The Kite Runner"

n "The Kite Runner", what is the symbolism of kite flying, sheep, Hassan's car, the pomegranate tree, wrestling a bear, and tourists?

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dymatsuoka | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted July 26, 2008 at 3:56 PM (Answer #2)

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Kite flying is symbolic of freedom, joy, and camaraderie.  In the 1970s, when Amir is growing up, flying kites is a popular pastime, but in 1996 it is banned in Afghanistan entirely. 

A sheep is a traditional symbol of sacrifice, a victim offered to God so that the deity will look down kindly upon his people.  When Hassan is victimized by Assef, he is the sacrifice that will allow Amir to look better in the eyes of his father.

The car is a symbol of affluence, with the taint of foreign influence.  I don't believe Hassan ever has a car, but Baba does, and it signifies that he is a rich man.

The pomegranate tree is symbolic of Amir and Hassan's friendship.  As children they spent happy hours in its shade, but during the process of his betrayal, Amir pummels Hassan with its.  When Hassan writes Amir as an adult he mentions waiting under the tree, even though it is barren.

Wrestling a bear signifies his strength of character, pf Amir's father, which Amir could never match.  When he returns to Afghanistan and rescues Sohrab, Amir realizes that, like his father, he has finally been able to be the one doing the wrestling.

Tourists are visitors to Afghanistan, people who come to take but do not share its sorrow.  Farid accuses Amir of being a tourist when even when he lived there, because his family was rich and he was able to remain insulated from the common people's suffering.

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morninglily | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 7, 2009 at 3:09 AM (Answer #3)

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Kite flying is symbolic of freedom, joy, and camaraderie.  In the 1970s, when Amir is growing up, flying kites is a popular pastime, but in 1996 it is banned in Afghanistan entirely. 

A sheep is a traditional symbol of sacrifice, a victim offered to God so that the deity will look down kindly upon his people.  When Hassan is victimized by Assef, he is the sacrifice that will allow Amir to look better in the eyes of his father.

The car is a symbol of affluence, with the taint of foreign influence.  I don't believe Hassan ever has a car, but Baba does, and it signifies that he is a rich man.

The pomegranate tree is symbolic of Amir and Hassan's friendship.  As children they spent happy hours in its shade, but during the process of his betrayal, Amir pummels Hassan with its.  When Hassan writes Amir as an adult he mentions waiting under the tree, even though it is barren.

Wrestling a bear signifies his strength of character, pf Amir's father, which Amir could never match.  When he returns to Afghanistan and rescues Sohrab, Amir realizes that, like his father, he has finally been able to be the one doing the wrestling.

Tourists are visitors to Afghanistan, people who come to take but do not share its sorrow.  Farid accuses Amir of being a tourist when even when he lived there, because his family was rich and he was able to remain insulated from the common people's suffering.

The car I believe is meant is the car Amir gets as a gift from his father while in America, and it symbolizes the change in their relationship.

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laurenzlindenbauer | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 30, 2010 at 12:31 AM (Answer #4)

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The car symbolises a change in their relationship. Maybe there is a hint of foreign influence which son and father accept due to the fact that they are imigrants. But I would disagree that the ford that Amir gets from Baba is a replacement for the verity that Baba is in a highert social class or richer than Amir.

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