What is the summary, setting, and time period of Mockingjay?



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mlsldy3's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

Mockingjay is the final book in the series written by Suzanne Collins. In this book we see that Katniss has become something of a rebel. She begrudgingly accepts her new role. Katinss, her sister, Prim, and her friend Gale, all become members of the rebellion. Peeta is still being held prisoner at the Capitol. 

Katniss knows that she must fight president Snow, if she wants to ever be able to survive again. In this book, Katniss learns much about life and love. The story never gives a date for things, but we know it is set in the distant future. The world has changed and America is not the one we knew. In this final book, we see Katniss grow into the woman she was always destined to be. Though she faces many tragedies in her life, she is a fighter and comes out stronger. The losses she has to deal with all make her the woman she is now. 

"That what I need to survive is not Gale's fire, kindled with rage and hatred. I have plenty of fire myself. What I need is the dandelion in the spring. The bright yellow that means rebirth instead of destruction. The promise that life can go on, no matter how bad our losses. That is can be good again. And only Peeta can give me that."

The whole story comes to an exciting climax at the end of this book. The whole story tells us that no matter how bad things are, they will get better.

slchanmo1885's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #1)

Mockingjay is a work of fiction by Suzanne Collins that takes place in a dystopia (an imperfect world) called Panem that is run by a Capitol that oversees 12 districts. The districts have rebelled, and Panem is at war. The time period is unclear, only that Panem is formed sometime in the distant future from our present time, after North America has been destroyed. As for a complete and detailed summary, please visit eNotes' Essentials on Mockingjay for the in-depth answers to these questions (the link is below). 


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