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Students with ODD I need some more strategies on how to handle the behaviors of a...

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nlagmay | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 27, 2008 at 12:43 AM via web

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Students with ODD

I need some more strategies on how to handle the behaviors of a kindergarten student with ODD.  I have tried behavior charts, a token system, time away from the group, rewards, positive reinforcement and small motor activities for release of energy. He is very agressive to his peers and defies authority. 

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slchanmo1885 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted November 30, 2008 at 6:43 PM (Answer #2)

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I had a preschool student with ODD several years ago. It is an incredibly difficult situation in a classroom but it is important that a comprehensive support system is in place. If you can set up a system with the child's parents, other teachers, and school administration, when an episode occurs you have some help in handling it. Since ODD children have power struggles with authority figures, make sure that you have very clear and simple expectations. Pick battles carefully, everything becomes a power struggle so choose carefully when you want to confront the conflict. Consistency is also key. It is very important for children with ODD to know exactly what is expected of them and what will happen if they break those rules. If you can put in place a conflict management program in your classroom, the child might benefit from that, as well as the rest of the students. I wish you the best of luck.

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jennifer-taubenheim | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted December 7, 2008 at 9:11 AM (Answer #3)

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I recently went to a great conference on ODD and CD (conduct disorder) given by neuropsychologist Emily Stevens. She has a very successful and important private practice. One of her most important tools is the use of the QEEG and brainmapping. She discussed behavioral disorders, how to identify them, triggers for these disorders, and also treatment options. And there are options. She also discussed certain health concerns that can look like behaivoral issue if unaddressed. One example is thyroid problems. The like below is to her speaking schedule. http://www.brainmappingadd.com/upcomingevents.htm

There are also a few other diagnosis that can go along with or be mistaken for ODD. They include: ADHD, OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder), mood disorders (depression, bipolar), anxiety, aspergers, PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). Also to be considered: social or family issues, learning disabilities, speech or language problems, cognitive impairments, processing difficulties (visual, auditory, speed, etc).

As a side note, I am a special education teacher working with kids with behavioral and emotional disorders and am almost finished with my masters in this area. Please feel free to email me with specific issues and I will do my best to help you add to your bag of tricks for dealing with tough kids.

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lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted December 7, 2008 at 3:21 PM (Answer #4)

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To add to what Jennifer has posted, yes, be careful that what you are actually looking at is ODD.  Especially important is the difference with CD; when dealing with a child with a conduct disorder, a common mistake is to try to elicit empathy for others. With CD, very little if anything matters to the child except how things affect him or her personally. The child needs to have rewards/consequences very clear and immediate so that the desired behaviors are reinforced.

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jennifer-taubenheim | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted December 8, 2008 at 1:26 PM (Answer #5)

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To add to what Jennifer has posted, yes, be careful that what you are actually looking at is ODD.  Especially important is the difference with CD; when dealing with a child with a conduct disorder, a common mistake is to try to elicit empathy for others. With CD, very little if anything matters to the child except how things affect him or her personally. The child needs to have rewards/consequences very clear and immediate so that the desired behaviors are reinforced.

Great point, Lynn!

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higgins221 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 8, 2008 at 7:42 PM (Answer #6)

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I teach in high school and even with my ODD students I have noticed that if I am in closer proximity to them I don't have as many problems with them.  I have discovered as I teach that the closer I am to any student (this is especially relevent to students with ADHD) the less problems I have with them.  Hope this helps!

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 7, 2011 at 10:00 PM (Answer #7)

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The key is to remember that you are never going to be able to form a normal relationship with this child.  He will not respond to the same incentives that other students do, and he will not try to please you.  This child has undoubtedly suffered a great deal in his life.  If you can teach him some social skills, he will be better off.  Experiment, and figure out what he DOES respond to.  It might be food, stickers, time to himself, or a game.  Whatever it is, build your incentive program around that.

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