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Is Brave New World's conclusion adquate, both in regards to the meaning and the plot?It...

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grammarbob | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 21, 2012 at 1:55 PM via web

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Is Brave New World's conclusion adquate, both in regards to the meaning and the plot?

It seems to me that Huxley's thoughts on technology are more important throughout the story than character development, especially in the last chapter. Many characters' fates are left ambiguous, and John's appears to be the only definitive end (concluding the comparison between worlds as well).

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 21, 2012 at 2:09 PM (Answer #1)

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What is interesting about the ending of this novel is that it is so different from perhaps what we expect to occur, especially when we compare this dystopian classic with others such as 1984. In a sense, what we are led to believe will happen is either a complete destruction of the system of this new world and a return to full humanity as is shown to us in the savage reservation, or the complete suppression of John and the other characters that try and challenge the system, as happens to poor Winston Smith.

However, the ending, when it comes is neither one nor the other. The system remains exactly as it is, and those characters who challenge it are just removed to an isolated part of the world where they can be free to live their lives as they want to without threat of punishment. In the same way, John's death can seem to be rather an easy ending for the novel in one sense. He does not really challenge the new order of things and only gives in to the carnal lust and desire that characterises this world before killing himself because he feels he has betrayed who he is and what he stands for. In a sense, however, we need to remember that this novel, especially when we compare it to other dystopias, is much more darkly humorous and ironic than the bleak visions of the world that other authors give us. It is therefore perhaps fitting that the novel ends with the grimly ironic death of John and all that it stands for.

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