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Sonnet 116Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 is an eloquent portrayal of true love existing in...

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mudkipzarecool | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted March 23, 2012 at 9:29 PM via web

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Sonnet 116

Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 is an eloquent portrayal of true love existing in all time periods within human existence. But the element that strikes me the most is the fact that the rhyming couplet at the last two lines of the Sonnet and are only eye-rhymes, and not real rhymes- "Proved" and "Loved". There have been many instances where I have found people say that wither a) the pronunciation of the modern era is different from Shakespearean times, or that b) they are half-rhymes. But for me, this is not enough, and I have found myself asking whether or not this were done by purpose by the maestro of plays. So what I am asking is, what is the purpose of placing an eye-rhyme to the couplet and does it contribute to the themes and ideas of the poem?

  

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etotheeyepi | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted March 24, 2012 at 12:44 AM (Answer #2)

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Could the rhyming of  love with remove, come with doom, and proved with loved be Warwickshire grammar? 

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rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 24, 2012 at 3:13 AM (Answer #3)

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Even in modern times, certain English-speaking peoples pronounce "loved" as something closer to "looved." Some with "come," which can sound like "coom."I think it is close enough to qualify as an actual rhyming couplet, and don't think there's much more to it than that.

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted March 24, 2012 at 6:05 AM (Answer #4)

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I like your theory on the eye-rhyme: Shakespeare telling us that what we see as harmony may not really be so. That said, as an English English teacher, there is a stronger case for the pronunciation of the time being the main issue.

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mudkipzarecool | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted March 25, 2012 at 4:18 AM (Answer #5)

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I like your theory on the eye-rhyme: Shakespeare telling us that what we see as harmony may not really be so. That said, as an English English teacher, there is a stronger case for the pronunciation of the time being the main issue.

thanks! you have enlightened me, and I personally like your interpretation of harmony, of seeing is not believing.

 

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