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Should students be allowed to retake a test that they have failed? If so, are there...

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted August 13, 2011 at 6:45 AM via web

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Should students be allowed to retake a test that they have failed? If so, are there other requirements that they must meet, such as a tutoring session, first? Should their grade reflect an average of both attempts, or just the second try?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 13, 2011 at 6:57 AM (Answer #2)

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I would never allow a student to retake the same test that they have already failed.  I have, at times, told students that I would ignore (or reduce the weight of) a poor grade if they would improve their grade on subsequent tests.  I think this is a good way of giving a student hope that their grade has not been irretrievably harmed.

I would not have any philosophical problems with giving a student a second test covering the same material as the failed test.  In such a case, I would not require anything of the student.  I would tell them it is their responsibility to study well enough to improve their grade.  I would probably (depending on my reading of the student's overall attitude) put much more weight on the second test.  (I'm known as being a pretty student-friendly teacher, though, and many would probably disagree with me.)

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 13, 2011 at 7:07 AM (Answer #3)

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I must agree with post #2. I would not allow a student to take the same test twice. I would, however, alter the test to examine if they have taken the time to study the concepts defined by the original test.

Normally I do not throw out a test score. I worked hard to create the tests and teach the material. But, the whole purpose is to see if a student can master the material (or at least maintain a grasp on the material).  If I must reteach, then I would ask the same question, but I would simply pose them in a different fashion.

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bigdreams1 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted August 13, 2011 at 10:37 AM (Answer #4)

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I don't allow retakes in my class, but some of the math teachers in our district allow what's called "corrections". The students can retry the questions they missed for a quarter credit each. This gives the students a chance to see where they might have gone wrong in thier calculations...and learn by fixing mistakes.

In most colleges...students are allowed to retake classes they have failed for a higher gpa. I so see some value in that...as they review all the material again...but if that is the case...I think averaging the grades is the better route to go...so the students just don't blow off the class the first time knowing that they can always do it again.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 13, 2011 at 11:40 AM (Answer #5)

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I do not allow students to retake the same test, because unfortunately too many would abuse the priviledge. Kids are smart, and they'll realize they can just bomb the first test and retake it later. They work the system. I do allow kids to demonstrate their knowledge in other ways to make up their grade, after tutoring.
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Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted August 13, 2011 at 2:16 PM (Answer #6)

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I offer so much to my students in regards to preparation for tests in my class, that there is no way I would ever allow a retake.  (This is not even taking into consideration the huge amounts of work in regards to test creation and grading this would require!)

My students know that, if they are truly worried about a particular test, they will not only have a review day where I use a game to ask actual test questions but also I will give any students "hints" who show up after school to my test study-session.  There is no excuse for failures on my tests.  *sigh*  For my students who still manage to fail anyway, I am always happy to give extra credit assignments.  (Often, this is doing research to help me teach my next unit!)

All of this being said, I have no problems with other teachers giving retakes, it just doesn't happen to be a method that I use.  Teaching is like parenting, ... respect for various styles is key!

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 14, 2011 at 3:08 AM (Answer #7)

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In very rare circumstances I will allow a retake, such as when a student was facing a personal or family crisis on test day and obviously were not themselves given the test results.  But in general, re-testing defeats the purpose of testing in my book.  It is important in my class for students to be prepared and fluent in material before we move on so they can build upon prior knowledge with each unit.  No retesting, no late testing and no late work are my motivators for them to work at the pace of the class instead of when they can fit it in somewhere.  I have found that, if students know they can retake a test, they don't have much enthusiasm to prepare for it the first time, and cheating is more likely to take place.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted August 14, 2011 at 6:01 AM (Answer #8)

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My opinion is, yes, retakes, should be allowed. I answered a question just the other day for a German student who was preparing for a re-examination in English Literature. Such a practice is and has always been traditional in English and European and European-based education, although their frequency of exams may be rather different from the American system.

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larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 14, 2011 at 7:30 AM (Answer #9)

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I tend to agree with Post # 8.  The purpose of teaching is to see that students gain and carry away knowledge from the course. A test is simply a means of determining if the student has absorbed that which we wished for him/her to absorb. A failing test grade means he did not do so; nothing more; and for that there may be myriad reasons, not all within the student's realm of responsibility. Perhaps the student did not understand; perhaps the teacher did a poor job on that lesson (yes, it happens.) Perhaps the student had a bad day, or some other mitigating factor. A teacher's role is not to punish a student with a poor grade, although far too many do. I never allow my students to take the same test ver batim, I make some changes to prevent memorization and regurgitation; but I do believe students need positive reinforcement at times, and for that reason, I do allow students to retake tests. If/when I allow a retest, I limit the amount of points they can earn to 75% of the possible test from the first attempt. This way, they are less likely to become discouraged, and I don't become the mean old referee who imposes punitive sanctions when they don't measure up.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted August 14, 2011 at 10:46 AM (Answer #10)

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I personally don't like the idea of retaking tests, especially an exact duplicate of a previous one. However, students sure like the idea of it, and many administrators consider it a way to make the student (and parents) happy by giving them a second chance to make a higher grade. Under some circumstances, such as if a student has been sick or under emotional distress, I think it would be appropriate, but most of the time it's just a way for a student to improve on a grade when he/she didn't prepare properly in the first place. As a teacher, it also means extra time and work making up a second test for retesting and grading.

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 14, 2011 at 10:46 PM (Answer #11)

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I think we need to consider the reason for the test and the age of the students. I taught seventh grade Social Studies, covering geography and civics - two topics not designed to highly motivate many seventh graders, and (rightly or wrongly) not a subject area evaluated by AYP high-stakes tests.

I allowed students to make corrections on chapter tests, based on use of notes and organizers and textbooks, and gave half-credit for each corrected answer added to their original score. My rationale was that, at this level for these students, the tests weren't the absolute final evaluation of their knowledge in the subject area. I observed connections being recognized and understanding taking place as they worked together to figure out the "what and why" while making their corrections. Because I wasn't in a situation where I had to produce definitive measurements of educational growth, I felt a somewhat more humanistic approach was acceptable.

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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted August 15, 2011 at 3:17 AM (Answer #12)

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I did offer retakes.  Personally, I am not a very good test taker, so I understand bombing a test when you actually know the material.  My students were required to attend at least one tutorial session before they were allow to retake the test.  The tutorial and the retake had to be schedule within a certain amount of time (I didn't want kids to come up and ask for retakes after they saw their progress reports).  My retake tests weren't easy either.  They were often more difficult versions of the original test.  For example, if the original test was multiple choice, I might offer the student a retake with the same questions but require them to use short answer rather than giving them answer choice options.  I gave the grade of the second test without exception; even if the student did better the first time, they still got the retest grade.  Usually, only a student with a legitimate concern about their grade and a true desire to improve would retake a test.

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jessica20 | Student | eNoter

Posted August 16, 2011 at 7:47 PM (Answer #13)

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Should students be allowed to retake tests?

Should students be allowed to retake a test that they have failed? If so, are there other requirements that they must meet, such as a tutoring session, first? Should their grade reflect an average of both attempts, or just the second try?

I think students can retake test under some circumstances like when he/she is too ill couldn't learn for exams. Apart from this when students fail regularly then they can get help from private tutoring. The private tutoring trend became more normal recently. And many reliable sites like tutorz provide good service.

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whateverittakes4learning | Teacher | eNoter

Posted August 16, 2011 at 11:37 PM (Answer #14)

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If the whole purpose of an assessment is to verify what students have learned, and they have not done well, then they haven't learned the information necessary. Our job is to assist them in that learning process. I would highly recommend retakes in different formats...not the same assessment given again again (we don't want memorization). If the student continues to do poorly on the same material and keeps subjecting themselves to retakes then a gap in learning has been established and can be worked on. I can't think of a person who would enjoy taking repeated retests just to fail...there has to be a want to improve. I say remember that it is the knowledge that we want to focus on, not the grade. Yes, this may cause more work for you as a teacher, but if you allow retakes and students learn from that process then you are doing a good job.

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whateverittakes4learning | Teacher | eNoter

Posted August 16, 2011 at 11:46 PM (Answer #15)

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I tend to agree with Post # 8.  The purpose of teaching is to see that students gain and carry away knowledge from the course. A test is simply a means of determining if the student has absorbed that which we wished for him/her to absorb. A failing test grade means he did not do so; nothing more; and for that there may be myriad reasons, not all within the student's realm of responsibility. Perhaps the student did not understand; perhaps the teacher did a poor job on that lesson (yes, it happens.) Perhaps the student had a bad day, or some other mitigating factor. A teacher's role is not to punish a student with a poor grade, although far too many do. I never allow my students to take the same test ver batim, I make some changes to prevent memorization and regurgitation; but I do believe students need positive reinforcement at times, and for that reason, I do allow students to retake tests. If/when I allow a retest, I limit the amount of points they can earn to 75% of the possible test from the first attempt. This way, they are less likely to become discouraged, and I don't become the mean old referee who imposes punitive sanctions when they don't measure up.

I have heard the 75% method, but I think that may tend to put a cap on their willingness to try again. "Why  bother if I can only get a 75?" I believe that effective assessments (not simple- and i emphasize simple- multiple choice) can further their knowledge. If, in the end they are able to answer the questions with higher accuracy then that is a more accurate measure of how much they have truly acquired. A 75 doesn't tell the amount of information they retained in the end, it represents a tendency to take longer (or more work) to learn it. Are we grading knowledge? What is the purpose of the assessment?

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daskalos | High School Teacher | Salutatorian

Posted August 20, 2011 at 11:08 PM (Answer #16)

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I believe that depends on the student.  If the student is truly trying they should be allowed to retake.  If the student can prove there are extenuating circumstances they should be allowed.

As I said a lot of it depends on the student.  I taught ESL and Remedial students and I have found it fairly easy to tell which ones were serious.  Let your couscious be your guide.

 

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted August 22, 2011 at 10:45 AM (Answer #17)

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I have a problem with retaking tests. The kids who do well on a test are generally the ones who prepare. Those who do not, generally don't do well. Most of the time, it's a question of priorities. I cover the material in class and try to review. If a student isn't doing the work, I don't see the point of giving a second shot: and honestly, most kids (I have found) don't use the extra time when it is given. (If there is a snow day the day the test is assigned, those who don't care don't use the extra time.) If a student is having personal problems at home or has been out sick for several days, I give them time to get notes, ask questions, and take the test later. I don't remember having opportunities to retake tests in college, and I don't imagine a boss will explain to a young employee that since the report is late or of poor quality, he (or she) can have a second chance. I think we are trying to prepare our students for a world after school. I think I'm fair enough and thorough enough that students have a real shot at doing well in my class, so I don't take the time to retest; I don't take the time to make up a new test. Somehow, for the other kids, it doesn't quite seem fair, either.

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jordaz1997 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted August 26, 2011 at 5:15 AM (Answer #18)

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Let them retake it. It is very helpful at times

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munmunlil | College Teacher | Honors

Posted August 29, 2011 at 6:31 PM (Answer #19)

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I would say yes.I always give my students a second chance.When they know it,they just got to strive harder.In my opinion,not allowing them to retake makes them feel that they could not succeed in life,or they'll stop at their tracks.The choice is yours,that is just my opinion.

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chemicaljonny | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 6, 2011 at 4:56 AM (Answer #21)

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I , as a student believe that students should be alowed to resit examinations, as matter of fact we do it in the UK all of the time.

 

For our GCSE and A Level exams: Resits are permitted for all students. Such a system has great consideration for those with issues around exam time that may effect performance, a lack of appropriate attitude which hasn't been sorted out yet and many other things including "Just a bad day".

 

At the end of it , we are the ones who pay when we have to resit an exam , wheras all the first time exams are paid for us by the school/college.

 

It gives students a second chance. Without resits, some students may miss out on showing thier full potential. If you got an F on your Chemistry Paper but resit it and then get an A or even an  A* .......... what does that say? The F is obviously not your true academic potential , something testing and examinations usually measure.

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schulzie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted September 6, 2011 at 7:20 AM (Answer #22)

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I agree with post 8 and 9.  I think tests can be a learning experience.  I would not give the SAME test over, but I have given students a chance to take the test again. I rearrange the questions so there cannot be memorization of answers, and sometimes I reword the questions so that they have to know the answer.  I also  make just essay retakes.  If they can explain in their own words, they know the answer.  They cannot make more than a 75 on it since they know the type of questions, and it is their second time taking the test.

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cheezea | Student, Grade 10 | Valedictorian

Posted September 9, 2011 at 10:40 PM (Answer #23)

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Actually, i quite agree with #21, as i have experienced a 'bad day' before. I suggest that retests can be capped at a certain score or let the score of that test be the average of both scores.

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rozo711 | eNoter

Posted September 11, 2011 at 12:08 AM (Answer #25)

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A student should never be allowed to retake the exact same test however "corrections" are not a bad idea as long as the student does not receive full credit for the corrected answer.

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thealinotes | eNoter

Posted September 11, 2011 at 10:06 AM (Answer #26)

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I let my students retake tests as many times as they like. At the end of the day its all about learning the material, not the grades

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lillymoon | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted September 11, 2011 at 10:43 AM (Answer #27)

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I think that students should be able to retake tests, but only once. The test should be different than the first, though, because then that person would have an unfair advantage. There is also the extra work it would take for the teacher to create another test, so a teacher does have a right to say no, but sometimes someone may be having a bad day or be stressed out about soemthing and may not be able to focus on the test that they are taking. I think they should get a second chance. Also, sometimes the teacher isn't very specific on what the student should be studying for the test, and therefore, the student isn't completely prepared for the test. I think it is fair for the student to get one last chance. Finals, however, are a different story, and this doesn't apply to everything. It really all depends on the situation. :)

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chinggaytin | Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 11, 2011 at 3:44 PM (Answer #28)

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Yes, i will allow my student/s to retake test as a sort of a removal if few of them didnt get 75% of the total number of items, depending also on some factors, we need to consider students. .Though we had given much already to them but our best should be given to them. Another test will be NOT of the same sets of test items, it could be same number of items, same type of questions but it should be NOT of the same test paper given at first. .In our school, we cater approximately 60 students per classroom since we are in a public high school,obviously the number is not conducive to learning or there are so many factors that we teachers needs to consider. I believe our students needs t be given a test retake if reasons are valid. .

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corsonj | Student, College Freshman | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 12, 2011 at 3:30 AM (Answer #29)

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I would honestly say as a student that we should be able to retake a different version of a test if we have a reason that we did poorly on the test. I would not expect a teacher to let me retake a test because, "I was not feeling well," but if there is a serious reason with evidence that supports that reason for me not doing well on the test (i.e. recent loss of family member), then yes, I would believe that that would be a reasonable cause for a poor test grade and therefore that student should be able to make up that test.

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted September 12, 2011 at 4:42 PM (Answer #30)

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I think retakes need to be in the same format but certainly different questions. This is the only retaking I ever experienced in the UK. I sometimes offer students the chance to retakeif there is a major reason or basic error (I just had a student write one essay answering six questions, rather than one essay answering one question) HOWEVER the retake is not worth any credits - I am just offering the student a clearer perspective on their ability.

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bethlaw | eNoter

Posted September 15, 2011 at 2:43 PM (Answer #31)

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Absolutely not! If you give some students a second chance to try for a better grade, what does this say to the students who did their due dilligence by studying properly and making a good grade? It's giving student A an unfair advantage over student B. Additionally, it sends the message to all of the students that studying hard (when necessary) doesn't pay off because you'll get a second chance. It's also giving student A the permission to disrespect the teacher by not following the teachers protocol and I would think this lessons the power of the teacher and the respect of ALL of the students!

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shizza123 | Student, Grade 10 | Valedictorian

Posted September 16, 2011 at 4:52 AM (Answer #32)

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..not unless they are hopeless and canot pass at all...... If they can do well, and simply slack off, then no... it will be a good lesson.

Plus, that would be unfair to all the other students who passed with a 51%.

If everyone did bad because the test was extremely hard, then yes. But no matter what the case is, the second test must not be the same as the old one. The questions must be changed.

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jonnypork | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted September 17, 2011 at 1:17 PM (Answer #33)

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In my opinon, I would allow the students to retake the test if:

  • The student has their own personal problem like a bad flu, high temperature or chicken pox which make he or she unable to have the test.
  • The student doesn't have enough time to review the test becuse he or she is busy helping their parents out or he /she has a very necessary thing to be accomplished or so on..
  • The student is busy attending the wedding or funeral of the relatives.

In conclusion, the student that has the following problems must be allowed to retake the test. He or she should deserve a second chance.

However, for the student who cheated in the examniation, didn't study well in class or revise the lesson well due to busy playing with toys or watching televison. This kind of student should not be allowed to retake the test in order to let he or she knows how valueble it is to listen to the teacher and study hard which could give them a better result than cheating!!

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snowy8991 | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted September 18, 2011 at 3:04 AM (Answer #34)

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I believe if they have done a stupid mistake like not realising that is double sided they should be able to take the other size and it to the first mark but if it is obvious they didn't try then it is just tough luck.

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 18, 2011 at 4:57 AM (Answer #35)

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Never. I also do not allow extra credit or revision after work is graded. If you allow retakes, extra credit, or revision, students will figure out that the most time-effective strategy is to turn in crap on the first round, and then only if it gets a failing grade, do as extras the work they should have done the first time. This can double or triple your workload.

I will workshop drafts of essays and do study sessions before tests -- but if a student doesn`t take advantage of those, then the student will, ideally, learn the important lesson that one must work hard or fail

 

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nirvisha | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 18, 2011 at 1:01 PM (Answer #36)

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Should students be allowed to retake tests?

Should students be allowed to retake a test that they have failed? If so, are there other requirements that they must meet, such as a tutoring session, first? Should their grade reflect an average of both attempts, or just the second try?

I, as a student, say yes to to it. I feel that it is a way of giving some hope and encouragement to a student to work harder the next time. When we, students have no idea of what the question will be like, we easily get nervous and start panicking. This results in getting low grades even though the questions are easy. this disheartens the student further. So, there should be retests as far as possible.
And, about the grade, it must be the avarege of both the tests.
I think mock exams also help students to get the idea of how the exams are going to be and what type of questions may be asked.

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smartipi | Student, Grade 10 | Honors

Posted September 21, 2011 at 8:06 AM (Answer #38)

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You want your students to do well. If they show they are interested by coming in for extra help and you can tell they studied hard and really care about doing well in school, then by all means allow them to retake the test. Just make sure the quiestions are worded differently so you know if they really know the material.

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embizze | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted September 25, 2011 at 1:04 AM (Answer #41)

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I allow corrections for a fraction of the missed points. As the year progresses, the value of the corrections goes down (e.g. by spring you can only get 1/5 of the missed points back). This reduces the "gaming" of the system -- by spring you will not be able to change a 50% score to a passing score.

I also have the students identify their errors, as well as provide the correct answer with supporting material. Thus the students have a chance to revisit material they might not have fully understood, and also they might see if they are consistently making the same types of mistakes -- hopefully making them pay more attention to these areas in the future.

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beckden | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted September 25, 2011 at 10:43 AM (Answer #42)

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The argument that "students are smart and crafty", so they will "blow off" studying because I allow them to retake tests makes absolutly no sense to me.

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ariana3316 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted September 27, 2011 at 12:49 AM (Answer #43)

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No. I always disagreed on the idea. If students are allowed to retake tests, it gives them the freedom to laze about and then lowering their sats level/ Work level. I never retake tests and I just agree on what I have done in the test. Students like me should just do the work the first time and let it be over and done with and teachers should see that retaking tests is not the appropriate way of dealing with tests.

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ravinderrana | High School Teacher | Honors

Posted September 27, 2011 at 2:08 AM (Answer #44)

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 My point of view is entirely different. The major aim of education is to ensure that at the end of the day, the benefit of any exam should go to the student. One thing we all have to accept is that failing a child is no way of making him/her learn. Therefore, even if the child is allowed a retest that gives him confidence and improves his grades, there is no harm done.

But such an exercise should be practised with caution. No way am I endorsing a practice that the student takes advantage of. What has to be assessed is whether a particular format helps widen the vision of child's learning. If he gains, let him take a retest on a few occasions, but do not make it a wrong precedence.

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jackie96321 | Student | eNoter

Posted September 28, 2011 at 11:40 AM (Answer #46)

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YES! i as a student have retaken a test. its helpful for us as students to retake a test.

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jbrenw | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted September 29, 2011 at 3:11 AM (Answer #47)

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Yes

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postcardfromparis1 | Student, Grade 11 | eNoter

Posted October 2, 2011 at 1:09 PM (Answer #48)

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I agree with #4. I feel like students should not be able to retake a test; but go over the test, and fix any thing they did wrong, and get half credit for that problem.

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swimmy-megan | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:56 PM (Answer #49)

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of course students should be able to re take tests !!!!!!!!!!!!

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figlover | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted October 4, 2011 at 10:47 PM (Answer #50)

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It depends.

First of all, students should never be allowed to take the same test. Not only will they take it better cuz they already know the questions, but also that kind of test lost its purpose. What's point of taking the test when the students already know the questions and answers. To retake in that situation will be for the sake of grades only. Although there can be an exception; if students do not know the answers, they can study by looking up the answers.

But, if it different test with different questions, i think some students should be allowed to retake the test. THey may be sick during the test, or grandma died on the exam day, that kind of situation happens, and i think there should be  back up plan for that kind of situation.

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paisleysucks52 | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 6, 2011 at 6:49 AM (Answer #51)

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yes because they might get a better grade the second time around.Also because it helps them grow and it makes the world go round

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s4ukgp | College Teacher | Honors

Posted October 6, 2011 at 9:38 PM (Answer #52)

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Life never gives a Second chance, as every student should understand it, they should develop the habit of cracking any test, in their  first attempt, and if they fail to do it, they should try again later, as a teacher one needs to make the student understand that " dont be afraid of going slow, be afraid of standing still", developing passionate way of studying should be the sole objective of teachers, rather than making them lazy by give them the chance to retake the test.

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humairaa15 | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 8, 2011 at 7:14 PM (Answer #53)

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Should students be allowed to retake tests?

Should students be allowed to retake a test that they have failed? If so, are there other requirements that they must meet, such as a tutoring session, first? Should their grade reflect an average of both attempts, or just the second try?

Yes, students should be allowed to retake a test becuase they may have done badly on the first attempt due to stress etc, but the resit mark should reflect that they revised properly for the resit and should be better than the first score.

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riot174 | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted October 10, 2011 at 1:12 AM (Answer #54)

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As a student that has retaken a test I think it should be allowed. However, for me it has only been allowed for the Foreign Language I'm taking. I think it right for students to retake a test on a foreign language because most of the time they don't know what to expect on these kinds of test. Also my teachers in my other subjects allow for test corrections, where the student can earn additional points back but only if they find the correct answer themselves. That way they can learn from their mistakes and bring their grade up higher. Oh and if all subjects allowed for re-doing a test it should be a different version.

Sorry if i spelled anything wrong, I'm a horrible speller.

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blackantbeads | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted October 10, 2011 at 9:34 AM (Answer #55)

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I believe that students should always be allowed to retake tests. I also believe that thye should all be open book. In the real world people can look up the information. Why should they have to memorize it only for a test?!

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shihan | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted October 10, 2011 at 9:11 PM (Answer #56)

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Of course!

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damaster97as | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted October 11, 2011 at 5:51 AM (Answer #57)

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They should not be able to re take the same test. You can, however, allow them to try to make up for some of the points with extra credit, but not make up all of the points. A student cant go from a 60 to a 100, that isnt fair to the other students.

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riot174 | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted October 16, 2011 at 4:59 AM (Answer #59)

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I so agree with #55 !

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mattc321 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 23, 2011 at 7:15 AM (Answer #60)

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i would if not they will not like you and what if they do bad do u really want them to fail your class?

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riot174 | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted October 23, 2011 at 10:20 AM (Answer #61)

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it should be allowed. it helps you learn more i think

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gowrirajendran | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted November 3, 2011 at 2:56 AM (Answer #62)

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of course yes when they retake the tests t ll more useful for he students during their examination and also when the study fr their exam and more over wen they learn wit some keypoints and wen they unerstand well make them to jot down the points to their level so that wen they tak tat again t ll b easy fr them to recollect wat they have learnt

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poparu | Student, College Freshman | eNoter

Posted November 6, 2011 at 1:42 PM (Answer #64)

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From a student's point of view, giving a re-test is sometimes something that gives us hope. If a teacher would ever be so kind to give us a re-test, it would be a second chance to better ourselves, especially if something happened during the testing week that distracted us from school. But giving a re-test should only be a privileged, and a privilege that should definently earned. In my opinion, there should be extra assignments or extra work associated with a re-test, that is self correctable by the student. Then after all of that work is completed a re-test, that is much harder than the first one, should be administered.

So an example of this method would be:

1. Student misses or does poorly on the test.

2. Student asks for extra assignments that need to be turned in, within a limited time period.

3. Student finishes those assignments, shows the teacher the finished work and then the teacher gives them the answers to correct them with.

4. Student corrects them then asks for a time to take the re-test. Whatever time is best for the teacher that's when the test should be taken.

5. Student finishes the test and hands it in.

6. OPTIONAL: Teacher gives student answers to correct the test by themselves at a time where they can be watched by the teacher or other responsible faculty member or teacher.

 

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poparu | Student, College Freshman | eNoter

Posted November 6, 2011 at 1:42 PM (Answer #65)

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This is just a wrap up to my last post above

The whole point of my method is to give the most work out to the student on the material they were struggling with and give as little work to the teacher as possible. This is just a basis of what I think about re-tests. I hope its a concise plan.

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bhawanipur | College Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted November 7, 2011 at 8:34 PM (Answer #66)

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I agree with post- 8 because I have read an article of Bernard Shaw and there he wrote that even after we pass out from university taking PG degree and join the society; we are again in the first form. Examination, to me, is not to measure deepness of knowledge but to appeal students to read those lessons to acquire first hand knowledge. Acquiring knowledge either by reading books or any other way is an life long process. One girl of a degree college came to me for help because she has failed in the examination for the fourth time. I saw she did understand whatever I discuss with her, could write nicely with good hand writting but she failed because she became panicky in the examiation hall.

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studywarehouse15 | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted November 7, 2011 at 11:49 PM (Answer #67)

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As a student, my teachers have allowed me to take a test. Because the way our system works, is that they don't want us to fail. They want us to master the subject or Lesson that we are learning. I think it is fair to let the student re-do the problems they missed, but only if they will learn from it. Like I do.

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dayanith | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 9, 2011 at 8:19 AM (Answer #68)

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Should students be allowed to retake tests?

Should students be allowed to retake a test that they have failed? If so, are there other requirements that they must meet, such as a tutoring session, first? Should their grade reflect an average of both attempts, or just the second try?

No, definitely no why? because students are supposed to learn and study. Just because they are lazy to do so and failed.. Its not necessary to repeata test. Yes, many other students get a A+ that dosent mean that because another failed is ok to repeat. The A+ student study while the other just did not. So if a person get a good grade that means everybody can have a good grade.

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robineliza | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted February 20, 2012 at 5:31 PM (Answer #69)

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Not to be selfish about this whole idea, but the workload issue must be addressed.  I find that I'm a less effective teacher under this system of retakes, because I am grading twice as many papers, retesting kids until 4pm several days per week, and writing new assessments when I should be lesson planning.  I am with students from 7 - 3:30 most days - and that includes my lunch time, and then I take two hours of work home as well.  I also devote at least one weekend day to work.  Some of this comes from teaching a new class this year, but most of the work comes from the retake policy.   Teachers that coach, and are thus not available after school are using what would ordinarily be instructional time to retest students.  This is completely unfair to students who DID study the first time, did well, and are ready to move on. 

Another issue that I find is that the grades no longer are very discriminating between excellent students, who really do "get it," and much slower students who only "got it" after several retakes.  Both types of students get A's, but I find that the students who needed several tries have a much lower understanding of the material.  They are learning to the test, not to the comprehension and connections that define "A" students.  An A now means only that a student met the minimum competency required for most of the standards.  Hardly exemplary.

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grieve-o | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 25, 2012 at 10:03 PM (Answer #70)

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Great discussion thank you.  I have allowed students to resit exams both the same and recreated ones.  I did find, however, the same students where starting to take advantage of my good will and energy.  So over the years I have refined my way of conducting retests to this:   In my class resits only happen if the student is meeting my expectations of behaviour and effort. It is a privlege not a right! They also must sit the test in their own time, lunchtime or after school, never in class time.  As they sit the same test, the maximum mark they can receive is the miniumum pass mark and at my present school this is 55%.  This allows for redemption, learning, values those students that do well in the original examination.  This way, I also do not have to redesign, test and recreate solutions for another test and this helps to keep my workload manageable.  Students only resit the test once and the best score is used (often 55%). By no means do I believe my system is perfect.  I want to spend my energy teaching welll so I do not have to have resits but I found that this is a very fair method which students also believe worthwhile. Now my faculty take on this apporach and we are ready for the discussion about how many retests should be allowed within a semester?  We are also starting to experiment with testing in pairs and whether to allow 'open book' and/or summary sheets.  Exciting discussions ahead.

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arrellbelle | Student, College Sophomore | Valedictorian

Posted July 28, 2014 at 4:46 PM (Answer #71)

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As a student, I would love the idea of retaking the same test; however, that entirely depends on several factors. Did other students in the same class/course do well or horrible on the test? Ask students why they got the scores that they got. Most of the time it could be that the students did not study, they were not aware of what would be on the test, or it could be the phrasing or questioning of the questions. I was blessed to have teachers like that in high school and college who took into account factors such as the ones i've listed above because it shows that a teacher is actively trying to help a student learn and succeed rather than just flat-out reject them if they failed a test once.

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