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Should all humans be DNA typed at birth and entered into a world-wide registry? I,...

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boblawrence | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted October 23, 2011 at 6:56 AM via web

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Should all humans be DNA typed at birth and entered into a world-wide registry?

I, myself, would have no objection to having my DNA profile in a data base available to law enforcement. I feel that if the DNA of everyone on earth were in a data base, getting away with major crimes against persons would be markedly reduced. Paternity issues could be readily resolved. The assumption of false identities would be precluded. Unidentified bodies would no longer be a problem.

I recognize that many would feel this is in invasion of privacy. However, isn't it similar to having people's fingerprints on file? It could be argued that the only persons who would object to having their DNA on file would be those planning to commit crime. Your opinion?

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 23, 2011 at 7:16 AM (Answer #2)

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The potential for abuse, by government agencies, law enforcement, insurance companies, you name it, is massive in such a scenario.  I don't think it is a good idea to take peoples' DNA unless 1) it is voluntary, and/or 2) they have committed crimes and represent a direct threat to society.  The benefits you list seem unworthy of the privacy we would sacrifice, and the abuse we could be subjected to.

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larrygates | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 23, 2011 at 7:17 AM (Answer #3)

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I also would have no objection to having my DNA profile determined. There are numerous uses, medical and otherwise that might be made of it other than tracking criminal activity, although this certainly would be one use. I do think, however, that it should be completely voluntary and not a requirement. There are any number of persons who for whatever reason strongly object to anyone knowing anything of their personal lives. Privacy in this regard is not a great concern for me; but it might be for others. Therefore I would wholeheartedly support DNA type casting at birth provided the parents of the child issue an informed consent agreement.

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted October 23, 2011 at 8:19 AM (Answer #4)

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This is a really interesting proposition!  While there are pros and cons to every issue, I think the good would likely outweigh the bad here.  I can see where privacy might be an issue, but if there were proper legal protections in regard to the uses of the DNA information, then many of those concerns could be precluded. For example, the information could be used in criminal justice cases, but not for scientific research without prior consent. As you mention in your post, I am especially intrigued about the potential to lesson crime. If you know you would more likely be caught would you not commit the crime?

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belarafon | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 23, 2011 at 8:46 AM (Answer #5)

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While I agree that having all our DNA in a database would make it easier for the honest among us (we have nothing to hide, after all), I still have to say no. As #2 says, the potential for abuse is incredible. Also, it is a privacy issue; I don't need anyone knowing my genetic makeup unless I give permission.

If this was a law in serious danger of being passed, I'd advocate for a voluntary submission process: if you feel that you have nothing to hide and want to be easily cleared of other people's crimes, go ahead. If you don't want to submit a sample, no one should force you to. However, when law enforcement needs samples from suspects, these samples should be entered with full record of the investigation and a notation that they were or were not cleared of suspicion.

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 23, 2011 at 8:51 AM (Answer #6)

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I would agree with the suggestion given by belarafon, voluntary submission. The only problem here would be that parents, if done at birth, would be making decisions which could affect their children later in life if the children were to disagree with the process (see it as an invasion of privacy).

I do like the impact of lessening crimes.

Overall, I am intrigued by the question posed.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 23, 2011 at 9:00 AM (Answer #7)

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My main worry would be related to things like medical insurance or even to my chances of getting hired for a job.  My problem would be that I would worry that I might end up getting rejected by an employer or insurer because of something they found in my DNA.  What if they found that I have a propensity for some sort of cancer that would end up costing them a lot of money if I ended up contracting the disease?  Might they not reject me so as to save money?  I'm not too worried about the crime aspect, but I would worry about this.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 23, 2011 at 10:11 AM (Answer #8)

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I would have no problem allowing voluntary DNA sampling, and in a perfect world it's a great idea to collect samples of each new birth. But brettd makes an even greater point in the second post. Government abuse is rampant at most levels, and I would find it difficult to trust officials who are entrusted with maintaining the confidentiality of DNA data.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 23, 2011 at 10:26 AM (Answer #9)

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I think it's a little scary because I can see the potential for abuse. We have become so reliant on DNA that everyone seems to think it's infallible.  It's still an inexact science though.  For example, let's say there is only a small amount of DNA at a crime scene or it's corrupted, but it's the same type as yours and yours is in a registry.  People might assume you're guilty even if you're innocent.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 23, 2011 at 10:11 PM (Answer #10)

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My masive fear about this is the way that this would produce a huge data bank that would be the target for terrorists, hackers, criminals and underground organisations the world over. Just think of the potential for identity theft and the way that various peoples could frame innocents for crimes they didn't commit. Whilst I don't have any problem giving a DNA sample for this, I strongly doubt that any government is capable of designing a system that is capable of protecting this incredibly valuable information.

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 24, 2011 at 12:52 AM (Answer #11)

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I would absolutely not want my DNA on file. It seems like every month someone has hacked yet another "totally secure" database, and in a country where health insurance is a private, for-profit enterprise, that information is far too valuable to place at risk. If I am carrying a marker for cancer or Huntington's disease or something like that, I don't want that data where anybody can get at it.

I can also see a big, data-savvy employer (Google? Microsoft?) using such a database to screen applicants for things like an alcoholism gene; it wouldn't matter if you were a teetotaller, you'd still be blackballed for the job.

I know of someone who was turned down for a mortgage in the 1980's at a small town bank because somehow the bank found out that the individual had gone in for an HIV test. Although the test was negative, the bank made the assumption that the person must have been engaging in risky behaviors, and might die before the mortgage was paid off.

 

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted October 24, 2011 at 12:58 AM (Answer #12)

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What an interesting thread! I would not be an advocate for this. In principle this is a good idea, but in reality there will be problems. We would have no idea of how this information would be used. It can discriminate people in so many different ways, such as jobs, insurance, college admissions, and the like. Also you can imagine if this information got into the wrong hands, people can make an enormous profit. You can pay to get your potential spouses DNA to make sure that he or she is fit. The main problem is that all of this can reduce a person to their biological makeup. People are more than that.

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boblawrence | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted October 24, 2011 at 7:55 AM (Answer #13)

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My masive fear about this is the way that this would produce a huge data bank that would be the target for terrorists, hackers, criminals and underground organisations the world over. Just think of the potential for identity theft and the way that various peoples could frame innocents for crimes they didn't commit. Whilst I don't have any problem giving a DNA sample for this, I strongly doubt that any government is capable of designing a system that is capable of protecting this incredibly valuable information.

I think this post reveals a misconception about DNA. True, hackers could get into the data base, and therefore be able to match up a biological specimen such as blood with the person who shed it.  But they would not be able to frame anyone or steal an identity.  To do this they would have to be able to manufacture a biological material with the same DNA pattern of a person in the data base, then plant it at a scene.  This is not possible.  If you wanted to clone a person's DNA, you would have to start with a sample of their actual DNA, not a mere paper notation of the nucleic acid sequences it contains.

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bhawanipur | College Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted November 22, 2011 at 10:47 PM (Answer #14)

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Yes, that would help the administration as well as the person. It will be useful to a person to get help in case of his cetain disease. On the other hand whether it is local administration or national or international can have a track on people touring or migrating from one place/nation to another. For any short of crime we can easily find out the person involved in it.

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soccrkidz13 | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted December 5, 2011 at 9:24 AM (Answer #20)

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no of course not governments and other agencies could make you pay tons of money for insurance when you are born because of a desease they knw you will get in the future. also hackers could steal someones identity/dna so i vote no

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ohsballer10 | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 11, 2011 at 8:30 AM (Answer #24)

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I feel like if I were to die in some horrible way, that I wouldn't want to be labeled as "Jane Doe." I would want my name in some data base somewhere.

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dogtracks | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 11, 2011 at 8:30 AM (Answer #25)

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I think this would backfire in some way that it actually invades the core of privacy.

 

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dmcgillem | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted December 11, 2011 at 7:31 PM (Answer #26)

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I agree with all who are leary of this type of information being on file.  When I was in college, I had to research something similar to this and stumbled across information of the original intent of the SSN.  It was assured at the time, in order to be approved, that it would NOT EVER be used as a form of identification and would only be used for allocation and distribution of benefits.  Now, however, we have to present our SSN for a multitude of identification purposes.  No matter the assurances that the government might give about how the information would or wouldn't be used - only in crimes for identification of perpetrator, for example - I believe it would morph into other uses.  I agree strongly with number 7 about the possible abuses pertaining specifically to someone's proclivity for a possibly expensive disease.

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bjleblanc | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted December 12, 2011 at 2:43 AM (Answer #27)

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Personally, I have no objection to offering a sample of my DNA into a world-wide registry. There are those who will argue that this is an invasion of privacy; however, we must look at the overall safety of people around the world. That is what is most important regarding this issue--keeping innocent people from dying at the hands of terrorists.

 Will there be abuses of this by governments around the world? You can bet on it; however, we should be concentrating on the overall success of what the program would have to offer and weigh in on those advantages. Since the 2001 bombings of the World Trade Center, we have been pushed into a new world facing challenges we only envisioned before. I personally say, let's try this. We can always fine tune it as needed in order for the program to be successful.

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cardetailingphoenix | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 13, 2011 at 8:24 AM (Answer #28)

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Should all humans be DNA typed at birth and entered into a world-wide registry?

I, myself, would have no objection to having my DNA profile in a data base available to law enforcement.  I feel that if the DNA of everyone on earth were in a data abase, getting away with major crimes against persons would be markedly reduced. Paternity issues could be readily resolved. The assumption of false identities would be precluded.  Unidentified bodies would no longer be a problem.

I recognize that many would feel this is in invasion of privacy.  However, isn't it similar to having people's fingerprints on file?  It could be argued that the only persons who would object to having their DNA on file would be those planning to commit crime.  Your opinion?

i think it is a gteat idea to help solve crimes and missing persons and the like.. but a little too BIG brotherish for me. But i have no problem giving my dna.

___________________

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lightindarkness | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 19, 2011 at 1:29 AM (Answer #29)

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I shudder at this thought. the abuse of these DNA records would be great among the CIA and FBI and other goverment organizations. (short and sweet)

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maybutler | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 7, 2012 at 5:47 PM (Answer #30)

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Having our DNAs registered is not likely that advisable because it may crash through our privacies. It might have some advantages but I don't totally agree with it. Anyway, in Virginia Beach, Carpet Cleaning Proz strive to make our residential and commercial clients the happiest clients of a carpet cleaners that can be. If you need carpet cleaners visit us now carpet cleaning virginia beach.

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enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted January 10, 2012 at 11:23 PM (Answer #31)

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Only if done voluntarily, and only if the government has no access to it, meaning it be kept private, and I would add the proviso that one could withdraw your DNA information at will, and no further record would be kept.

Without those safeguards, we are merely donating data to those to whom we should not entrust such information.  Those who argue that it would "help solve crime" may have a point, if in solving the crime the government got a warrant to examine a particular individual's information.  That would at least have some safeguard through the court on law enforcement activity, but as we have seen in recent years, that concept seems to have disappeared, and such agencies act with impunity.  On the contrary, setting up such a system will "help perpetrate crime" through governmental abuses.

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miamicarpet | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 17, 2012 at 3:16 PM (Answer #33)

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My DNA is unique and it's only between me and God and no one else should take account on my DNA but only me and HIM. Anyway, in Miami, Carpet Cleaning Proz strive to make our residential and commercial clients the happiest clients of a carpet cleaners that can be. If you need carpet cleaners visit us now Carpet Cleaning in Miami.

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painterfairfax | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 23, 2012 at 10:01 PM (Answer #34)

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No, I am completely and totally unfavor of this. Hope this will not be implemented totally and not to be enforced. Anyway, I want to share with you what I know about painters Fairfax VA. They can provide excellent painting services, exterior and interior painting needs.  Fairfax painters provide the most reliable fast and excellent painting services.

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kurbybryant | Student, Grade 11 | eNoter

Posted January 30, 2012 at 6:28 PM (Answer #35)

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While I agree that having all our DNA in a database would make it easier for the honest among us (we have nothing to hide, after all), I still have to say no. As #2 says, the potential for abuse is incredible. Also, it is a privacy issue; I don't need anyone knowing my genetic makeup unless I give permission.

If this was a law in serious danger of being passed, I'd advocate for a voluntary submission process: if you feel that you have nothing to hide and want to be easily cleared of other people's crimes, go ahead. If you don't want to submit a sample, no one should force you to. However, when law enforcement needs samples from suspects, these samples should be entered with full record of the investigation and a notation that they were or were not cleared of suspicion.

Yes, in doing DNA registration or should we say micro chip implantation, we will be vulnerable to invasion of own rights and privacy. I want to share with you what I know about Plumber in Virginia Beach. They can offer assistance in providing the highest level of plumbing services like installation and repair. Plumber in Virginia Beach provides home plumbing, emergency plumbing and commercial plumbing services. They are the solution to all your clogged drains and massive water blockage and all your plumbing needs.

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printingfairfax | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 1, 2012 at 3:54 PM (Answer #36)

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While I agree that having all our DNA in a database would make it easier for the honest among us (we have nothing to hide, after all), I still have to say no. As #2 says, the potential for abuse is incredible. Also, it is a privacy issue; I don't need anyone knowing my genetic makeup unless I give permission.

If this was a law in serious danger of being passed, I'd advocate for a voluntary submission process: if you feel that you have nothing to hide and want to be easily cleared of other people's crimes, go ahead. If you don't want to submit a sample, no one should force you to. However, when law enforcement needs samples from suspects, these samples should be entered with full record of the investigation and a notation that they were or were not cleared of suspicion.

Yes, in doing DNA registration or should we say micro chip implantation, we will be vulnerable to invasion of own rights and privacy. I want to share with you what I know about Plumber in Virginia Beach. They can offer assistance in providing the highest level of plumbing services like installation and repair. Plumber in Virginia Beach provides home plumbing, emergency plumbing and commercial plumbing services. They are the solution to all your clogged drains and massive water blockage and all your plumbing needs.

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