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As Scout waits for the verdict, she thinks of earlier events. What are these and how do...

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mor3210 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 18, 2007 at 10:40 PM via web

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As Scout waits for the verdict, she thinks of earlier events. What are these and how do they remind us of the novel's central themes?

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gbeatty | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 19, 2007 at 12:31 AM (Answer #1)

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In Chapter 21, while Scout is waiting for the verdict, she thinks about something Jem had told her about the power of human concentration, and she tries to act on it. (Much of the novel focuses on young people learning to act on what they've been taught, and on forming community.)

She also thinks about the mockingbirds and how they fall silent in February. (The physical world sometimes echoes the emotional world in the book. Also, winter is a time when the world is dark and despair seems likely; that's the case now, when Atticus loses the case.)

She thinks of the carpenters stopping their hammering on Miss Maudie's new house, and the workmen building a new house after the old burns down is like Maycomb must rebuild into a new community after this travesty of justice.

Greg

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