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Scout said, "He ain't company, Cal, he is just a Cunningham." What did she mean by...

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sarahshere357 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 21, 2010 at 5:48 AM via web

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Scout said, "He ain't company, Cal, he is just a Cunningham." What did she mean by that, and what was Cal's answer?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 21, 2010 at 5:57 AM (Answer #1)

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Scout says this to Calpurnia in Chapter 3.  She is talking about Walter Cunningham.

Walter comes to eat at the Finch home because Jem invites him.  Jem feels bad, I think, because Scout had been beating Walter up.

When Scout says this, she is telling Calpurnia that Walter does not deserve to be treated like company.  She says that he is just a Cunningham and is therefore low class and does not need to be treated well.

Calpurnia gets really angry at her and tells her that anyone who comes in the house is company whether they are rich or poor.

"Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in
this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin'
on their ways like you was so high and mighty!

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