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In "The Raven," what does the poem mean?I mean his theories are so human, so confusing,...

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deesafur | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 19, 2007 at 2:04 PM via web

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In "The Raven," what does the poem mean?

I mean his theories are so human, so confusing, so complicated. I just don't understand what the poem means.

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jamie-wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted April 19, 2007 at 8:00 PM (Answer #1)

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Don't feel badly! This *is* a complicated poem. Perhaps having some keys to understanding it will be helpful.

First, think of the poem as being written like a puzzle. As readers, we are presented with this strange situation, feeling rather than knowing what is going on.
As the stanzas progress, pieces of the puzzle come together.

The most important themes of the poem are that of loneliness and the inexplicability of some things in life. "Lenore" is the speaker's lost love. The raven knows only one word, "Nevermore." The speaker knows the bird does not reason; it had been taught the word by someone by "some unhappy master" and it and really means nothing. Therefore, the bird cannot be a trusted oracle.

This knowledge does not prevent the speaker from asking the bird melancholy questions for which the only possible answer will be the raven's croaking, "Nevermore." ("Can Lenore be found in Paradise?" "Nevermore!")

Eventually tired of his self-imposed torture, the speaker gives up. The final "corner piece" of the puzzle is put into place. The speaker's conclusion is that like the raven's meaningless squawking of "Nevermore!" there is no reason or moral lesson to be learned from the loss of Lenore.

Sources:

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souljagurl012 | Student, Grade 9 | eNoter

Posted October 25, 2007 at 10:07 AM (Answer #2)

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The most important themes of the poem are that of loneliness and the inexplicability of some things in life. "Lenore" is the speaker's lost love. The raven knows only one word, "Nevermore." The speaker knows the bird does not reason; it had been taught the word by someone by "some unhappy master" and it and really means nothing. Therefore, the bird cannot be a trusted oracle.

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f1234567890 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 14, 2007 at 1:12 AM (Answer #3)

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That the nararater is losing his mind like a crazy homosidel psycopathic nut job and that he will never see lenore again EVER, EVER, Again.

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mamahmood96 | eNoter

Posted November 2, 2011 at 9:48 PM (Answer #4)

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The most important themes of the poem are that of loneliness and the inexplicability of some things in life. "Lenore" is the speaker's lost love. The raven knows only one word, "Nevermore." The speaker knows the bird does not reason; it had been taught the word by someone by "some unhappy master" and it and really means nothing. Therefore, the bird cannot be a trusted oracle.

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marebare323 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 26, 2012 at 6:25 PM (Answer #5)

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im just doing this because my english teacher made me and i honesly think that the raven is stupid and the writer person is a freak obsessing over his dead girlfriend so when the raven comes the guy thinks that it will bring lenore back then he realizes how stupid he is being and eventually gets like 50 cats

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