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What approach would you use to isolate only cells that contain this new structure? In a...

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dgault11 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted July 15, 2013 at 2:25 PM via web

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What approach would you use to isolate only cells that contain this new structure?

In a newly-explored deep-sea environment, several potentially new species of apparent bacteria have been discovered. In some of these single-celled life forms, a novel structure has been observed. The structure is apparently bound to the interior surface of the cell membrane and so does not float freely in the cytosol. Preliminary investigation indicates that this structure typically appears circular or ovoid in shape. It apparently consists of a long chain of nucleic acid wrapped around a tube of an unknown protein.

OPTIONAL QUESTION CHOICES

What techniques could be used to characterize the structure and composition of the structure?

How might you identify the type of protein and nucleic acid?

What would you hypothesize to be the function of this structure?

To what eukaryotic organelle might this structure be analogous and why?

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Kay Morse | College Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted July 17, 2013 at 9:38 PM (Answer #1)

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Several approaches are used to separate the different cell types from a mixed cell suspension. One exploits differences in physical properties. (NCBI)

Some of the things to take into consideration when separating the cells that contain the structure describe are whether the cells are bound by an extracellular mixture that needs to be disrupted; whether there is a large-small size difference between these and other cells that allow for a large cell-small cell separation; and whether the cells containing the structure have adhesion qualities that might allow them to adhere readily to a glass plate while other cells without adhesion properties would not adhere, thus isolating the cells on the basis of adhesion.

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