It is possible for a child to have cavities if eating raisin cereals?

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herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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There was an article published Dec. 18 of this year that said that "added sugar in raising cereals increases acidity in dental plaque"- this was on Science Daily. They also advocate that, instead of raisin cereal, use bran flakes with raisins alone.

This means that you can make your own bran flakes at home, or buy the organic, gluten-free type, and add fresh raisins or even packed raisins rather than boxed cereal.

The article also says the sugary substances such found raisins are no different than those caused by bananas or apples, and all fruits do not stick to the teeth enamel the way chemical substances do.

Included is the original article. Hope this helps!


pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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It is possible for a child to have cavities no matter what the child eats.  When you mention raisin cereals, I assume you mean that the child is eating that kind of cereal instead of something with more sugar?  Eating raisin cereals may help make cavities less likely.  Even so, it doesn't matter -- people can get cavities no matter what they eat.

First of all, cereal is not all the child eats.  They are eating other meals too so what they eat at those other meals will have an impact on whether they get cavities or not.

It is also very important to think about how the child is caring for his or her teeth.  Children who brush and floss are of course less likely than other children to get cavities no matter what they eat.

Finally, genetics come into it as well.  Some people have teeth that are more resistant to cavities no matter what they eat or how well they take care of their teeth.

versatilekamini's profile pic

versatilekamini | College Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

 Some dentists believe that raisins can cause cavities because they are difficult to clear off the tooth surface, said Christine Wu, professor and director of cariology research at UIC.In a previous study at UIC, researchers identified several natural compounds from raisins that can inhibit the growth of some oral bacteria linked to cavities or gum disease.

Eating commercially marketed raisins  caused to significantly more acid in the plaque.Plaque bacteria on tooth surfaces can ferment various sugars such as glucose, fructose or sucrose and produce acids that may promote decay.

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