Please interpret Cash's quote at the end and explain your reasonsIn the last part of the novel, Cash says “That it is better so for him. This world is not his world; this life his life.”  Do...

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kiwi's profile pic

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I think that Darl deserves to be free of the burdens of his family, and it is touching that Cash is able to see that Darl deserves something better. However, I concur with #2 in that he does not deserve to go to an insane asylum. What Darl needs is peace. He has lost himself, which is why he speaks in the third person, and he does deserve another life, but a better one.

e-martin's profile pic

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Darl is suspected and accused of being strange on several occassions in the novel, yet he is also identified as the only member of the family to show any natural feeling toward Adie as she dies. 

I have to agree that Darl's world is not "this world" but I don't think that an insane asylum is where he belongs either. Darl is different, more empathetic than others, more in tune with the subtle internal lives of those around him than other characters are, but I don't think he is crazy. 

quentin1's profile pic

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Please interpret Cash's quote at the end and explain your reasons

In the last part of the novel, Cash says “That it is better so for him. This world is not his world; this life his life.” 

Do you agree? Cite examples from the novel to support your points.

Darl looks for human meaning in a world that does not show any. He loves his mother, Addie, but she favors Jewel. His father, Anse, cares less about burying Addie than he does in getting a new pair of teeth. Darl may indeed be crazy, but perhaps that's because the world in which he lives--a world of extreme poverty, family disintegration, and social collapse--has driven him crazy. As Cash observes, no one can say who is crazy and who isn't. But Cash is right in that Darl is dangerous to himself and others--he might not belong in an insane asylum, but he needs to be quarantined in a supervised environment. Darl's fate is an example of the world in which he lives: it's unjust and cruel, but perhaps necessary. This world is not his world, this life--life in an unfair world--his life.

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