Pet PeevesOK, we know you have them, so let's hear them!Mine is an obvious one, but one that seems to keep getting worse and worse-- apostrophes that aren't supposed to be there! 

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litchick2011's profile pic

Posted on

This has probably already been said, but my biggest pet peeve is when people hypercorrect....

"Just between you and I..."

I know it is snotty, but I really want to give an impromptu grammar lesson...."No, no, between is a preposition, making the pronouns after it objects of the preposition...so they must be in the objective case."

I think these folks would walk - off mid rant, so I have never tried this. 

eabettencourt's profile pic

Posted on

Whew!  I thought I got worked up over grammar!

I LOVE the last sentence of post #28.  It is absolutely true, in my opinion.  While grammar has its important place, we shouldn't get so incensed by grammatical errors that we overlook a student's ideas.  In my state's standardized testing, the content of the required essay is given far more weight than the grammar and mechanics.

That being said, I am a pretty big grammar nut.  You all should read, if you haven't yet, "Eats Shoots and Leaves" - it is brilliant!

Also, some of you may want to proofread your own posts for grammatical errors.  I counted several, not including post #27, which was clearly done for comic effect.

  While I agree that content is, of course, very important, if one has poor grammar, that clearly gets in the way of good content!  If an instructor/teacher cannot get past the grammatical errors in one's essay because they are frequent, and in some cases, major errors, that clearly gets in the way of being able to understand the content because the instructor/teacher must re-read it several times.  

Also, I have a real problem with instructors from other disciplines that do not check grammar and do not care if their students' papers are grammatically correct.  What kind of message does this send the student?  That as long as their content is good, how they put it together does not matter?  I personally weight grammar nearly as important as content when I grade students' papers. Content/organization is 60% and grammar is 40%.  Wonderful ideas are great; however, we cannot use that to simply set aside the grammar errors.  I do not like excuses, so to me, I do not excuse grammar errors simply because the writer has brilliant ideas.  

I am off of my soapbox now. :-p 

Agreed.  I never said grammar was not important.  I simply have seen far too many high school students give up trying to express their ideas in writing when grammatical mistakes are attacked, especially in early drafts.  It is my belief that a teacher should respond to ideas first, then help the student to edit grammatical errors. 

kwoo1213's profile pic

Posted on

Whew!  I thought I got worked up over grammar!

I LOVE the last sentence of post #28.  It is absolutely true, in my opinion.  While grammar has its important place, we shouldn't get so incensed by grammatical errors that we overlook a student's ideas.  In my state's standardized testing, the content of the required essay is given far more weight than the grammar and mechanics.

That being said, I am a pretty big grammar nut.  You all should read, if you haven't yet, "Eats Shoots and Leaves" - it is brilliant!

Also, some of you may want to proofread your own posts for grammatical errors.  I counted several, not including post #27, which was clearly done for comic effect.

  While I agree that content is, of course, very important, if one has poor grammar, that clearly gets in the way of good content!  If an instructor/teacher cannot get past the grammatical errors in one's essay because they are frequent, and in some cases, major errors, that clearly gets in the way of being able to understand the content because the instructor/teacher must re-read it several times.  

Also, I have a real problem with instructors from other disciplines that do not check grammar and do not care if their students' papers are grammatically correct.  What kind of message does this send the student?  That as long as their content is good, how they put it together does not matter?  I personally weight grammar nearly as important as content when I grade students' papers. Content/organization is 60% and grammar is 40%.  Wonderful ideas are great; however, we cannot use that to simply set aside the grammar errors.  I do not like excuses, so to me, I do not excuse grammar errors simply because the writer has brilliant ideas.  

I am off of my soapbox now. :-p 

eabettencourt's profile pic

Posted on

Whew!  I thought I got worked up over grammar!

I LOVE the last sentence of post #28.  It is absolutely true, in my opinion.  While grammar has its important place, we shouldn't get so incensed by grammatical errors that we overlook a student's ideas.  In my state's standardized testing, the content of the required essay is given far more weight than the grammar and mechanics.

That being said, I am a pretty big grammar nut.  You all should read, if you haven't yet, "Eats Shoots and Leaves" - it is brilliant!

Also, some of you may want to proofread your own posts for grammatical errors.  I counted several, not including post #27, which was clearly done for comic effect.

kwoo1213's profile pic

Posted on

Another really annoying thing for me that I have told students to never do is say, "This paper is about...," "I will talk about...," etc.  Bleck.  Another is the use of second-person "you" to generalize.

michael336's profile pic

Posted on

Number one pet peeve is confusing of "its" and "it's."  Or perhaps I should say, the refusal to use "its" at all!  I even saw this on the local unversity's cable channel: "Like it's counterpart, KCEN...."

There also seems to be a fear of not including enough commas, therefore, they are, at all times, added, so as, not to be forgotten.

mclouse's profile pic

Posted on

I can't agree enough with everything you all have written here.  I'd like to add to the list of irritants all of the texting lingo that has found its way into our students' papers. 

2 = two, too, to

4 = four, for

idk = I don't know

pippin1313's profile pic

Posted on

You know what kills me? Firstly, secondly, thirdly, in conclusion. I can count...I know where each paragraph comes in the order of things. Plus, as a marker for our national exams (in NZ), it reads as clumsy and immature.

Oh and 'a lot' as one word, 'in front' as one word...in fact anything that should be two words but for some unknown reason is written as one.

Students who say 'yous' or that they 'writ' something. Just why?

As for the random apostrophes! Have they started appearing in your advertisements yet? They are all through ours.

The horror...

kwoo1213's profile pic

Posted on

Wow!  That is a very interesting story (the guys who have gone around correcting sign)...although their intentions are admirable, they apparently aren't good at thinking about what the consequences of doing this kind of thing would be LOL.

katemschultz's profile pic

Posted on

Awesome! I'd love to meet these guys and give them each a pat on the back!

malibrarian's profile pic

Posted on

your, you're

their, there, they're

its, it's

Good grief, people, why are these really so difficult to get right?????? :)

rleahennis's profile pic

Posted on

My pet peeve is the ever popular vague pronoun. Why tell the reader what you are actually referring to when you can just use the word it or thing, or stuff. 

sullymonster's profile pic

Posted on

I love students who try to spell out their contractions, but end up falling off the log.  Example:  Could've = could of.  Argh!  I have seen this so many times at the high school level, and it astounds me that teenagers don't know what words are being contracted.

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