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The persons which were with Caesar and which against him & summary till Act-3,Scene-1...

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manjot | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted February 27, 2007 at 8:51 PM via web

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The persons which were with Caesar and which against him & summary till Act-3,Scene-1 and how & why Brutus joined Cassius?

What was Anthony doing at that time ; why can't he go and tell Caesar all about what he heard about the conspiracy against Caesar? What were three mistakes done by Brutus?

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lpace | Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 26, 2007 at 5:18 AM (Answer #1)

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Marcus Antonius was characterized (by Shakespeare) as a "reveller" -- which is clearly noted by Caesar himself in Act II, scene ii, "See! Antony, that revels long o' nights,
Is notwithstanding up. Good morrow, Antony." Therefore, he may very well have been too busy "revelling" to have noticed any suspicious behaviors from the conspirators.

I'm not aware of a set number of mistakes made by Brutus in Shakespeare's play, but I can name several:

  • Brutus ignores his intuition that Cassius is up to no good, or as Brutus himself put it, leading him into "danger" by asking him to see "that which is not in me." (Act I)
  • The letters addressed to Brutus (planted by Cassius) use very familiar language as they urge Brutus to awake and "see thyself" -- as Cassius himself urged Brutus to do earlier. Once again, Brutus is not listening to his intuitiveness.
  • Naturally, Brutus makes a major mistake as he allows Marc Antony the last word during Caesar's funeral. In doing so, he loses the favor he'd originally won with the plebians as Marc Antony moves them to rage against the conspirators.
  • More than anything, however, is Brutus' reason for killing Caesar in the first place; All of his "reasoning" is based on probables...what Caesar "might" do if crowned king. He refers to Caesar as a snake's egg that, when hatched, will unleash his venom at will...has Brutus become an augurer himself? Should we execute people for what they "might" become capable of?

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