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OthelloIs Othello logical in killing Desdemona at the end of the drama though he was...

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oshanyalinda | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted February 9, 2012 at 1:01 PM via web

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Othello

Is Othello logical in killing Desdemona at the end of the drama though he was decieved by Iago? Because he does it not for his sake but for her own good.

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kiwi | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted February 9, 2012 at 2:05 PM (Answer #2)

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I think Othello kills Desdemona because he believes he has been dishonoured. He believes she has been unfaithful and this stain upon is honour is more than Othello can tolerate.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 9, 2012 at 2:26 PM (Answer #3)

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The previous post is absolutely right about why he kills her.  Is it logical?  I don't think it's supposed to be logical.  Love and jealousy and such things are not at all about logic.  They are purely about emotion and passion.

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enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted February 10, 2012 at 12:27 AM (Answer #4)

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From out vantage as the audience (or reader of the play) this clearly was a crime of passion. Othello, under the influence of Iago's manipulations, didn't see it as a crime -- she had dishonoured him and the penalty was death.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 10, 2012 at 1:23 AM (Answer #5)

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He also kills her out of jealousy.  It is one of those if I can't have her no one else can thing.  He spends so much time trying to prove he is as good as everyone else, or better, that he does not realize he is being played.

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 10, 2012 at 7:17 AM (Answer #6)

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I do not believe that it is meant to be taken as a logical move either. Instead, I believe it speaks to the reality of how one's emotions impact one's behavior and actions.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 10, 2012 at 3:06 PM (Answer #7)

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How can it be for Desdemona's own good that Othello kills her? I think this is actually an example of how Othello becomes completely overpowered by his turbulent emotions and kills Desdemona out of unthinking irrational jealousy and pity.

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vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 11, 2012 at 1:20 PM (Answer #8)

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I think that his killing of Desdemona is meant to be understood as the opposite of logical, despite all the reasons and justifications he gives for it.  Those reasons are so unconvincing that their presence in the play helps emphasize just how illogical Othello is being at this moment.

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mizradane | High School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted July 2, 2012 at 4:01 PM (Answer #9)

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How can it be for Desdemona's own good that Othello kills her? I think this is actually an example of how Othello becomes completely overpowered by his turbulent emotions and kills Desdemona out of unthinking irrational jealousy and pity.

How is it explained that he kills her out of pity?

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