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Please help me describe a scenario of leadership hoarding or leadership giving away power.

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kisstopher603 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted February 18, 2013 at 2:08 AM via web

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Please help me describe a scenario of leadership hoarding or leadership giving away power.

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Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 18, 2013 at 3:38 PM (Answer #1)

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Leadership hoarding occurs when a leader prefers to micromanage instead of delegating. Delegation is a leadership dimension and it is also a sign of good leadership. However, when a leader is not fully prepared to let go of power, the immediate response is to break down the chain of command and use the "divide and conquer" technique. This is basically the act of separating the individual powers of the organization by taking self-sufficiency and empowerment away. These dynamics result on co-dependence from subject to leader.

A scenario of this kind is seen in situations where there is a project and several people with similar talents are working together. If the assigned leader feels threatened by the others being just as good or better than the leader at what they do, what will happen is that this leader will prevent the others from fully participating from their role within the project. Hence, the leader will want to do everything, or will want to assign meaningless tasks to the others while keeping the bulk of the work so that, in the end, more credit is due to the leader's role than to the role of the others.

For instance, a bad student leader in a college setting where students of the same major are working on a final project will want his or her participation to be credited better than that of the peers. Hence, rather than letting everybody show their talent at the task, the leader will re-arrange the tasks so that the peers will end up doing very little, if anything at all. Some leaders will do this under the pretense of wanting to help, or wanting to "speed up the pace", when in reality there is no real concern for the group, but  for individual credit.

Overall, the reason behind this behavior is ultimately insecurity and the awareness that there is a lack of talent on the leader's part.

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