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One of the themes of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis...

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joiner | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Honors

Posted February 28, 2012 at 1:17 AM via web

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One of the themes of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson is the limits of science and corruption that comes with power. What are Robert Louis Stevenson's thoughts about this?

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 28, 2012 at 3:43 AM (Answer #1)

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s tale, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, reflects his deeply moral and Calvinistic bent. He was raised a Presbyterian in the Church of Scotland, and thus believed in original sin. Because all men were created sinful, it is impossible to be saved except for grace. Thus Dr. Jekyll’s efforts to try to escape his own sinfulness by scientific means is not only futile, but like Lucifer’s rebellion, an attempt to usurp the powers proper only to God. The story serves to reinforce a message of moral responsibility (you have to struggle with your own moral imperfections) and of humility (scientific ingenuity can’t make living a moral life easy)

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