The "Oldies but Goodies"What are some "classic" films from before 1970 that you enjoy (they do not have to be movies that came from literature)?  A couple of my favorites is Double...

The "Oldies but Goodies"

What are some "classic" films from before 1970 that you enjoy (they do not have to be movies that came from literature)?  A couple of my favorites is Double Indemnity and The Maltese Falcon, among many othere!

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appletrees's profile pic

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I also think the Adventures of Robin Hood is wonderful; I taught it for a class on color in cinema.

 

Some of my favorite classics include Rebel without a Cause, Singing in the Rain, Bringing Up Baby, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, His Girl Friday, Oklahoma!, and some of the Rock Hudson and Doris Day romantic comedies like Send Me No Flowers and Pillow Talk.

jilllessa's profile pic

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Other classic films include Casa Blanca, A Man for All Seasons, It Happened One Night, Citizen Cane, Stagecoach, Bringing Up Baby, and Bridge Over River Kwai.  I used all of these films for a classic American film club and my high school students really enjoyed them.  You might try looking at the American Film Institutes "100 greatest film list"  You can find it easily by searching on google.

malibrarian's profile pic

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The Lion in Winter (with Peter O'Toole and Katherine Hepburn)
Gone With the Wind
It's a Wonderful Life
The Wizard of Oz
White Christmas
The Bells of St. Mary's
Miracle on 34th Street (with Natalie Wood & Maureen O'Hara)

You can see that when I think classic movies I think Christmas a lot of the time! :)

Oh...The Glenn Miller Story with Jimmy Stewart...I cry everytime I watch it!!!

linda-allen's profile pic

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I saw a preview recently for a new remake of "The Women." The old version, starring Norma Shearer and Joan Crawford, is one of my favorite movies. I'm sure the new one will add a lot of potty language and bedroom scenes.

ms-mcgregor's profile pic

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I think "The Graduate" is still a classic film. The issues surrounding how we make decisions about life and the coming of age theme are all still relevant today,

amy-lepore's profile pic

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I remember watching Marilyn Monroe, Katherine Hepburn, and The Odd Couple...those are among my favorites.  Later on, I'd have to add John Wayne.  I enjoyed his films for his "Americanness"...I know it's not a word, but it fits.

linda-allen's profile pic

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I have been introducing my 4yo son to Gene Kelly.  There's nothing like watching him dance; he has such an ease and a loose style, yet he is so powerfully built.  My favorite is Singin in the Rain, which I also like because of the humor with which they handle the introduction of the talkies.  And now my son can mimic the whole umbrella scene from memory--it doesn't get much better than that!

I love Gene Kelly! I miss his style of dancing. Today's dancers are more like gymnasts than dancers!

missrice's profile pic

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I have been introducing my 4yo son to Gene Kelly.  There's nothing like watching him dance; he has such an ease and a loose style, yet he is so powerfully built.  My favorite is Singin in the Rain, which I also like because of the humor with which they handle the introduction of the talkies.  And now my son can mimic the whole umbrella scene from memory--it doesn't get much better than that!

dbello's profile pic

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One of my favorite films is Mr. Smith Goes To Washington, I think it has the power to strike at the central core of most Americans.  Everytime I watch this film I find wonder in the simplicity of the American "idea".  Although some might argue that the film has a "corny" quality by today's standards and as a nation we are not without faults, there is no doubt that the film connects us to the ideals we aspire to.

sullymonster's profile pic

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I have always liked The Philadelphia Story, the original version with Hepburn, Grant, and Stewart.  You can't beat the cast, and the story is just such fun.  I miss the more understated comedy that many of the oldies had, which is why I'm such a fan of British TV and film. 

engtchr5's profile pic

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My favorite personal classic film has got to be Errol Flynn's portrayal in "The Adventures of Robin Hood." He and Olivia DeHaviland made the movie what it was, and it had a great soundtrack for that era. Ted Turner colorized it, but that only made the characters more vivid, in my humble opinion.

For English teaching purposes, John Wayne's role in "The Quiet Man" was well-done, even if the movie didn't stick too well to the book.

linda-allen's profile pic

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I like "Double Indemnity" too. I just have to watch "Mildred Pierce" every time I see it in the TV schedule. I also love "The Women," "Notorious," "All About Eve"....Oh, I could go on forever.

kwoo1213's profile pic

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One of my favorites is "A Place in the Sun."  I like the way it takes a complicated(and very long) story like "An american Tragedy" and captures the essence of the story.  It's also interesting to see famous actors early in their careers.  There is also an interesting production of "The Scarlet Letter" made in 1926 with Lillian Gish.  I've only seen it once (16mm) because it's really difficult to find.  I managed to get it to show a class in the late 60's, but haven't seen it since.  It's a very interesting take on the novel.  If anyone knows where I can get a copy, please let me know.

  Lillian Gish was a fantastic actress.  What a treasure!  I had no idea she had done The Scarlett Letter.  I'm not sure where you could pick up a copy of a movie that old.  Have you tried searching on Ebay, perhaps (you never know...it is worth a try)?

timbrady's profile pic

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One of my favorites is "A Place in the Sun."  I like the way it takes a complicated(and very long) story like "An american Tragedy" and captures the essence of the story.  It's also interesting to see famous actors early in their careers.  There is also an interesting production of "The Scarlet Letter" made in 1926 with Lillian Gish.  I've only seen it once (16mm) because it's really difficult to find.  I managed to get it to show a class in the late 60's, but haven't seen it since.  It's a very interesting take on the novel.  If anyone knows where I can get a copy, please let me know.

lleavy's profile pic

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While teaching the era of the Great Depression to my middle school students, we read the novel, Esperanza Rising in Language Arts.  In their social studies class,  I showed the video, The Grapes of Wrath, hoping they would grasp a visual image of this time period.   Much to my astonishment, my students valued the lessons taught in the movie and were able to make connections between Esperanza's struggles and the characters in The Grapes of Wrath.  I was worried that the students would be "turned off" to the black and white presentation.  But they agreed that the lack of color added to the desperation of the times.  It was a great teaching experience! 

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