Old Man Warner can be characterized as traditional.   What evidence reflects this from the text?

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Old Man Warner represents tradition in a couple of ways.  The first is that he outwardly states that he has been through 77 lotteries. He is the representation of how the tradition of the lottery has been in place for so long and why it should always be there.  He is a traditionalist in how he critiques Summers for "joking it up there" with the others who come forth to claim the papers for the family.  When others in the crowd suggest that the lottery should be suspended or even eliminated, Warner rebukes this idea calling such people, "a pack of young fools."  Warner also argues that the lottery translates into traditionally good harvests and crops.  In this, Warner believes in the lottery and argues that the basis of the town exists in the lottery.  Warner represents traditional notions of the good because he refuses to accept that some modification in what has been present should or could even be embraced.  Old Man Warner makes it clear that, in the end, the identity in the town is rooted in its past.  To change that is to immeasurably change its present and future.

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