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What is the cartoon's meaning in terms of 'big businesses' and 'the...

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spongebobs | Student | (Level 1) Honors

Posted May 26, 2012 at 10:55 AM via web

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What is the cartoon's meaning in terms of 'big businesses' and 'the protestors'?

http://politicalhumor.about.com/od/Occupy-Wall-Street/ig/Occupy-Wall-Street-Cartoons/Why-Do-You-Hate-Me-So-.htm

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 26, 2012 at 11:50 AM (Answer #1)

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I think that the cartoon depicts the challenging relationship between the protesters in the Occupy Wall Street movement and the wealthy that have difficulty in understanding the purpose of the movement.  The personification of "big business" in the cartoon is depicted in a typical "1%" fashion, right down to the fact that the Occupy Wall Street protester is at the bottom of the businessman's shoe.  Part of this relationship lies in sheer questioning on the part of the wealthy as to "why now."  What is there uniquely going on right now that would cause such an intense anger towards wealth and the acquisition of wealth?  There has been economic disparity in American capitalism for centuries, so the question is asked as to why right now, at this moment, there is so much antipathy towards that which has existed for so long.  It is for this reason that the businessman is plainly asking "Why do you hate me so?" without much in way of sarcasm in facial expressions.  In this, another aspect of the relationship between the "1%" and the "99%" is revealed in that there is a sincere and genuine lack of understanding on the part of the former as to why the latter is so upset and filled with so much anger and hatred.  In this, the cartoon reveals a more interesting dynamic to the relationship between both groups, something that brings out the question as to how the genesis of American capitalism has shown such a relationship to be intrinsic to its growth.

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