In the novel The Witch of Blackbird Pond, while traveling to Connecticut what went wrong?

2 Answers | Add Yours

anthonda49's profile pic

anthonda49 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

Actually, Kit grew to like Prudence on the voyage. She felt sorry for the little girl because her mother was so abusive. Her father did not stick up for his daughter against his wife. Prudence was not allowed to sit at the same table with the adults at the meals. She had to stand behind them and take whatever food they gave her. The child was described as pale, dirty, and scrawny. This liking Kit had for the child led to her jumping overboard to rescue the child's dropped doll her grandfather had made. Kit was unable to interact with the child during the voyage because Goodwife Cruff kept the girl away from Kit.

Kit longed to be on the open deck when the storm confined her below decks. Yes, the stench of the transported horses was horrible.

Kit was permitted much more freedom in Barbados, but she had to conform to the rules of the captain of the Dolphin and act like a proper lady. Her nice clothes alienated the poorer passengers, so other than an occasional chat with Nat or his mother (the captain's wife), she was lonely on the trip. Her manners and customs offended the Puritan women especially, so they began to gossip about her, laying the foundation for the witchcraft charges that would later be lodged against her.

mkcapen1's profile pic

mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

I am not sure if you are referring to the trip, it turned out bad in general.  First the wind kept dying down and the sail could not blow to keep it moving so the trip took longer than it should have taken.

Kit had to eat her meals with Goodwife Cruff and her husband who were boring and dull.  They also have a spoiled miserable child named Prudence who drives her crazy.

In addition, the horses that are boarded down below have caused such a stench that when a storm blew in, she was trapped with the stench through-out the storm.

We’ve answered 317,868 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question