What does it say about Nora that she constantly craves macaroons, which are a recurring symbol of temptation in the play?

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booboosmoosh's profile pic

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For Nora, sneaking macaroons without Torvald knowing may represent deception on her part and temptation by offering them to others, almost like Eve offering Adam a bite of her apple.

I also tend to see this as a childish ploy to see what she can get away with right under Torvald's nose. This may be an example of deceit, but in some ways I think it is an immature game she plays in that Torvald treats her like a parent, rather than a husband.

mshurn's profile pic

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The fact that Torvald monitors even what Nora eats shows the degree of his obsessive control. That she feels it necessary to pretend to follow his orders rather than standing up for herself shows how thoroughly he has intimidated her. For her to continue to eat what she wants, however, shows that she may be intimidated, but he hasn't broken her spirit entirely or destroyed her identity entirely. Nora still owns enough of herself to eventually find her way back to independence and self-respect.

jessdz's profile pic

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I agree with Aiden and everyone else for the most part, though I thought the macaroons symbolized Nora's freedom if we look at this from Jung's thoery of Psychic Individuation or "self realization" all Nora really wanted was to have the freedom that men had in that time period. Her defiance against Torvald strict orders not to eat macaroons because they would "rot her teeth" shows how her shadow presents itself or her desire to pocess the same freedom that men share.

aj-dunnigan's profile pic

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This is going to be the same as everyone else's comments cause everyone's comment are already pretty similar. Yeah!

Nora used the macaroons to rebel against the strain pressed upon her by Torvald to keep her figure. It gives her control of this portion of her reality. Torvald is that kind of guy who wants his women in shape and good lookin'; he doesn't want a homely, plain jane, overweight wife. This could be an insight into Torvald's shadow, showing his fears of her gaining weight and becoming that plain housewife rather than his prize. His persona shows him as a loving, caring husband that provides and works hard for his family, but this shows his shadow peeking through.

nvaniwaarden's profile pic

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It is hard to deny that the macaroons symbolize Nora's deception towards her husband, as they represent the first of her many lies throughout the play; however, the macaroons also signify Torvald's adult-like lust for the 'picture perfect' woman. Torvald, like every other man, wants the textbook trophy wife whom he can put on display. Thus, it is possible that Ibsen meant for these seemingly unimportant chocolates to epitomize the tribulations of such fake relationships.  

atramutolo's profile pic

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Nora's macaroons are a symbol for her deception. They are her first act of stealthiness and dishonesty towards her husband. Also, they can represent Nora herself because of the physical makeup of the candy. While they are chocolaty and sweet on the outside, they are completely different on the inside, often filled with coconut, which is unexpected by many.

hayley-deforest's profile pic

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The macaroons were Nora's way of trying to feel in control of her life. Torvald puppeted everything she did, so she hide the macaroons as a way of rebellion. They made her feel like she could still make decisions for herself. She obviously hated the way Torvald treated her and needed a way to vent those feelings. Also, they were foreshadowing to her leaving. Maybe it was a hint to Torvald that she was close to the breaking point.

jsgrjl's profile pic

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Macaroons are an important symbol in A Doll's House becasue of the control and barrier factors that are implemented on women during the late seventeenth century. Macaroons symbolize Nora's marginalization in society. Other symbols like the letter box and the her custumes were put in place to illustrate Nora's lack of power within Torvold's household.

nayely1507's profile pic

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Nora and the macaroons

As a reoccurring symbol in the play, the forbidden macaroons represent temptation and deception. What does this say about Nora, who has an apparent craving for the treats, and about the people she offers them to?

Torvald has this beautiful wife, who is picture perfect. Obviously, her eating habits have changed due to the image she has to keep up. Nora is basically cravin power, in order to find herself.

samuelperkins's profile pic

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The macaroons were Ibsen's way to bridge the gap between Nora's doll life and human life. It was the "light" at the end of the tunnel in wich Nora temporarily disabled the perception Torvald had on her and and temporarily ignited an insight on her true being. I agree with the second entry, for the macaroons only came out when the doors were closed and the husband was out. Nora eats the chocolates in front of Kristine even, showing Nora is more comfortable around her friends than she is her husband.

erikdeleon's profile pic

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The macaroons show how clever and deceitful Nora really is. It demonstrates that even when she wasn't allowed to eat macaroons, because Torvald told her not to, she does it anyways and gets away with it. Her cleverness and sly ways in this situation also parallel the IOU situation later in the play.

carric's profile pic

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According to Jungian theory, the macaroons symbolize Nora’s shadow, her selfish and deceitful self.  She does not share them with anyone, buys them with money she acquired through trickery, and lies about them to Torvald. All of these traits, selfishness, trickery and deceit, counter exactly what Nora is supposed to be like, and yet she craves them because she unconsciously craves the desires of her shadow.

bananamenagerie's profile pic

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As Nora eats the macaroons, it symbolizes her inner desire to be seperate from him. Although Nora has kept several secrets from Torvold, her secret macaroons are a secret all her own. It is a small piece of her independance from him. It could also act as forshadowing that she will initially leave him.

haleymiller's profile pic

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Nora and the macaroons

As a reoccurring symbol in the play, the forbidden macaroons represent temptation and deception. What does this say about Nora, who has an apparent craving for the treats, and about the people she offers them to?

Nora's need for the sweet macaroons shows not only her desperate need to rebel, but also a longing for excitement in her life. Being the "perfect housewife" can get old, especially when nothing that Nora does really benefits anyone but herself. This fact makes her duties seem irrelevant and unnecessary. Nora also enjoys driving Torvald insane and disobeying him. Him worrying about her means that he is paying attention to her, something that she likes whether the attention is positive or negative. Lastly, Nora has always been held on a short leash. The macaroons represent an aspect of her life that only she can have control over.

graceauther9's profile pic

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The macaroons serve as a tool to show how controlling Torvald is. Not only does Torvald emotionally control Nora, but he physically tells her that she cannot eat chocolate. Ibsen uses the chocolates to make it as clear as possible that Nora has a tough shell she needs to break out of by the end of the play.

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