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my wind colling my broth would blow me to an ague , when i thought whAT harm wind too...

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user7208565 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 27, 2013 at 6:17 AM via web

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my wind colling my broth

would blow me to an ague , when i thought

whAT harm wind too great at sea might do

i should not see the sandy hour glass run

but i should thimk of shallow and flats

and see my wealthy andrew docked in sand

vailing her high-top lower than her ribs

-who is the speaker ? whom are they addressed to ? when are these lines spoken in the play ?

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muddy-mettled | Valedictorian

Posted April 28, 2013 at 10:38 PM (Answer #1)

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The speaker is Salerio(some editors prefer Salarino because different spellings are found in the earliest text).  He is talking to Antonio, the merchant.  This is the "tedious brief scene"(A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, Act 5, scene 1) that begins or with which the play begins(Act 1, scene 1).  "Andrew," they say, was the name of a famous ship.  "Ague" means trembling fit, according to one editor.  I noted MND, in part because I have read that instructors today now often have students read aloud sellections from Shakespeare to make it more interesting, and the scene in MND is interesting in that regard.

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