Homework Help

“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun" -- what makes it memorable?What...

user profile pic

nikitasing | Student, Undergraduate

Posted October 31, 2012 at 1:36 AM via web

dislike 0 like
“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun" -- what makes it memorable?

What details make the images memorable?

4 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 31, 2012 at 2:47 AM (Answer #3)

dislike 1 like

I agree with the first post, but I'm not sure how much it really answers the question. To me, the details that most make the poem memorable (by going against the typical hyperbole about women's beauty) are the one about her hair being like wires and the one about how her breath "reeks."  These are pretty memorable images.

user profile pic

litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 31, 2012 at 2:23 AM (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

This poem is very funny, because poems usually involve poets using wild similes and metaphors to compare their girls to beautiful things.  Shakespeare does the opposite, and explains that his girl is not pretty.  He still loves her, but he does not put her on a false pedestal.

Sources:

user profile pic

nikitasing | Student, Undergraduate

Posted November 3, 2012 at 12:44 AM (Answer #4)

dislike 0 like

What mood do the images create?
How do the poem’s images help to convey its theme?
How effective are the images? How do they enhance your enjoyment of the poem?

What point does Shakespeare make in the first twelve lines of his sonnet?
What point does the rhymed couplet at the end of the poem make?
How is Shakespeare’s imagery like and unlike that of traditional love poems?
How do you think the woman to whom the poem is addressed will react?

user profile pic

nikitasing | Student, Undergraduate

Posted November 3, 2012 at 12:51 AM (Answer #5)

dislike 0 like

This poem is very funny, because poems usually involve poets using wild similes and metaphors to compare their girls to beautiful things.  Shakespeare does the opposite, and explains that his girl is not pretty.  He still loves her, but he does not put her on a false pedestal.

Trying to understand his poetry, What mood do the images create?
How do the poem’s images help to convey its theme?
How effective are the images? How do they enhance your enjoyment of the poem?

What point does Shakespeare make in the first twelve lines of his sonnet?
What point does the rhymed couplet at the end of the poem make?
How is Shakespeare’s imagery like and unlike that of traditional love poems?
How do you think the woman to whom the poem is addressed will react?

 

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes