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Robert Herrick, “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time.” Robert Herrick, “To the...

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nikitasing | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted October 24, 2012 at 6:07 AM via web

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Robert Herrick, “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time.”

Robert Herrick, “To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time.”

How would you characterize the speaker? Do you think he expects his listeners to share his views? How might his expectations affect his tone?


This poem is developed like an argument. What is the speaker’s main point? How does he support it?


 What effect does the poem’s use of rhyme have on its tone?


 Whose side are you on—the speaker’s or those he addresses?

 

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 24, 2012 at 3:04 PM (Answer #2)

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The poem is satirical.  The speaker is basically trying to get the girls to give in to him.  He tells them they won’t be young and beautiful, so what are they waiting for?

Sources:

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted October 24, 2012 at 7:25 PM (Answer #3)

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This post caught my attention because the poem is briefly quoted in the 80's movieDead Poet's Societythat stars Robin Williams. The teacher that Williams plays in the show tells the boys that the poem is about Carpe Diem!-- or seize the day! This later inspires the boys to experiment in a variety of activities that their parents probably wouldn't appreciate.

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