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music in public schoolsWith the research showing a direct lik between music in our...

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cdrewry | High School Teacher | eNoter

Posted May 21, 2010 at 11:45 AM via web

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music in public schools

With the research showing a direct lik between music in our schools and success in other classes, why do so many schools see it as the first course to cut, remove, or dimish budgets from? 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 21, 2010 at 4:04 PM (Answer #2)

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My guess is that this is because most people are like me and do not really believe that there is any link between having music in our schools and having kids do better in school.  I think that most people do not participate in music programs in high school and so do not really think that it is a vital part of the educational process.

I'm not convinced there is a causal relation between music and achievement.  You can say kids who do music get better test scores, but might that not simply be due to the fact that the higher achievers are picking music, not because music helps them at all.

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talon06 | Elementary School Teacher | eNoter

Posted May 21, 2010 at 5:03 PM (Answer #3)

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Simply put, I believe that people today place an importance on athletics first, academics second, and then the fine arts.  I believe that people see a school's success based on sports and academics.  Some people see the Fine Arts as expendable and not important.

Like I said, schools place their importance on sports and academics....not the Fine Arts.

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 22, 2010 at 10:11 AM (Answer #4)

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Because the people who fund public education work in the legislatures, and they only see music as an expense.  It is a number.  They also seek to measure student "success" or "learning" from some simple formulas and easy to read numbers, so they lean towards the easily measured subjects such as math, science, English, etc. vs. those artistic classes that are harder to quantify like Art and music.  So they get the first cuts every time.  It's a reality in my school too, and I hate it.

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anthonda49 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted May 22, 2010 at 3:04 PM (Answer #5)

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Music is what keeps some students in school. For others, it becomes a career path. Music is one of the learning styles by which people learn most effectively. Not all people are music lovers, but music gives vent to the human soul. I use music in my classroom to set a mood for writing. We use music in ads, television shows, movies, plays etc. Look at how many radio stations and music CD's are sold every year. Most people enjoy these kinds of entertainment. Where then will the musicians of the future come from?

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talon06 | Elementary School Teacher | eNoter

Posted May 23, 2010 at 6:43 AM (Answer #6)

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Music is what keeps some students in school. For others, it becomes a career path. Music is one of the learning styles by which people learn most effectively. Not all people are music lovers, but music gives vent to the human soul. I use music in my classroom to set a mood for writing. We use music in ads, television shows, movies, plays etc. Look at how many radio stations and music CD's are sold every year. Most people enjoy these kinds of entertainment. Where then will the musicians of the future come from?

That is why the fine arts, specifically music, are so important in our school systems.  Well said Anthonda!

 

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linalarocca | College Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted May 23, 2010 at 7:34 PM (Answer #7)

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I think it is wise to include music as part of the curriculum because some students require auditory components to make sense of the information an instructor is delivering. It is important to use differentiated teaching to reach all of the students in the class. I suppose the idea of eliminating music from school stems from the fact that most of what humans enjoy in their life includes a musical component; therefore, many people think that it is not appropriate to encourage music in the academic sphere. Unfortunately, students who seek out music are viewed by some teachers as lazy, disengaged, and socially driven rather than academically inclined!

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kapokkid | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 26, 2010 at 5:04 PM (Answer #8)

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One of the basic things that all cultures do is create music.  Whether it is with instruments or without, it is absolutely common in every single culture around the world.  This basic part of human culture is important developmentally and there are great benefits for a lot of people in studying it.  I am not going to say that everyone should be taking it, but for those that are interested I think it is vital that it is offered.

We have this incredibly stupid notion that you shouldn't study music or art because they aren't "valuable" and you can't make a living doing it.  Well, no one that I know is making a living learning facts and spitting them out on tests and then forgetting them which is what most subjects are teaching so perhaps we can get rid of that notion and at least consider not cutting funding for music the moment budgets get tight.

 

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted May 27, 2010 at 1:28 PM (Answer #9)

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I teach in the public school system but send my children to a Classical Christian school. My children don't have a Wii or gaming system of any kind, they have few toys. They do have many books, art supplies and take music lessons. Their school holds even parents accountable to keep children in musical and artistic experiences because of the rich expression it provides.

I believe until we have a parent body who cares like teachers do about children having these cultural experiences, music and art will continue to encounter cuts. Why do these cuts occur? Not enough people see the value because they do not have the value. That is a society who has gone apathetic.

How do we fix it? At the local level first, these programs must encounter parent support at board meetings. Sometimes that is going to take music teachers sounding the alarm and getting the right passionate parents there.

My son has sat at the piano many times and cried his eyes out for dread of having to practice or not getting a piece right. But, when he does overcome his battle, when he hears himself create crafty melodious tunes that impress his friends or fill his own soul, he finds great satisfaction and pride in the excellence he chose to pursue. We teachers can't go into homes and make that happen, but if we are parents too, we can instill that value in our own children.

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted May 27, 2010 at 2:39 PM (Answer #10)

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Music is not considered a core class. It is sad to say but the public school system is in big trouble right now and music and art are the first things that are cut.

I believe that music is an important part of curriculum but it is more or less considered an elective. I feel bad for the very creative students who are musically talented but unfortunately cuts have to be made somewhere I guess.

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