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Mis-communicated Love ?Rosa Hubberman loved Liesel as if she were her own however she...

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babifat16 | Student, Grade 11 | eNoter

Posted October 1, 2011 at 4:38 PM via web

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Mis-communicated Love ?

Rosa Hubberman loved Liesel as if she were her own however she had a funny way of showing it. occasionally parents have trouble communicating their love to their children. What details in The Book Thief shows that? (Let the discussion -hopefully- begin!)

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 2, 2011 at 10:31 PM (Answer #2)

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Well, I think this can be shown by the way in which Rosa Hubberman is constantly shown to be screaming her head of at Liesel and at other characters. The rather rough and jagged exterior she demonstrates clearly indicates the way in which she guards her true feelings under a very hard shell.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted October 3, 2011 at 9:32 AM (Answer #3)

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I do believe she cares about Liesel. Many people have a hard time expressing emotion. This is especially true in war time, when people are trying so hard to hold in their fear. Sometimes it feels as if letting one emotion go will result in losing control of all of them.
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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted November 29, 2011 at 8:04 AM (Answer #4)

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I think one of the most clear passages that demonstrates Rosa's love for Liesel comes at the very end of the chapter entitled "The Gamblers (A Seven-Sided Die)" when Liesel returns home without the washing from the Governor's wife.  Liesel claims it is her fault, and Rosa assures her that she knows it is not her fault.  As a result Liesel is "torn between distress and total mystification.  The one time she desperately wanted a Watschen and she couldn't get one."

To me, this is Rosa's full acceptance of Liesel into herself and her family.  What is not communicated here is, "We're in this together."

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