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Mental therapies and how we can improve it.Any ideas on how to provide concrete...

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figlover | Student, Undergraduate | Honors

Posted April 11, 2010 at 9:25 AM via web

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Mental therapies and how we can improve it.

Any ideas on how to provide concrete evidence on whether the psychological therapies are successful or not??

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted April 11, 2010 at 9:45 AM (Answer #2)

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When it comes down to psychiatric treatment the term “successful” seems subjective. Possibly a better way to think about it is “effective”. If the treatment is effective, than symptoms will be improved or eliminated and the patient will find an improvement in quality of life.

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figlover | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted April 11, 2010 at 10:01 AM (Answer #3)

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I can not agree more.

I should have been more careful using the word 'success'.

 

Almost every psychologists agree that there are no concrete evidence, e.g. blood testing, to assure that the psychological treatment had been effective or the patient had been cured. Then how can we rely on such therapies to cure our mental disorders? Furthermore, is the therapy only way to deal with our mental illness? Can't the patients be educated to deal with their own mental illness, rather than paying thousands of dollars just to have an hour session with the therapists.

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booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted April 11, 2010 at 4:40 PM (Answer #4)

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When therapies are used on kids, I like the idea of using "symptom" checklists by the parents to see if symptoms over a given period of time are reduced.

They are also using brain scans (see work of Dr. Daniel Amen) to detect changes in the brains of people with a variety of issues...including mental health. I remember reading something by Dr. Amen in which he mentioned how the brain scan of Kip Kinkel (teen school shooter) was, I believe, the most damaged teen brain he'd ever seen. So repeated brain scans (with treatment) on kids like Kinkel should show improvement.

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted April 11, 2010 at 6:22 PM (Answer #5)

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Monitoring is very important when determining if a certain psychological therapy is working or not. No matter what kind of therapy we are talking about it is important to remember that they take time. It is important to monitor the individual and keep a very precise written record of details. This way the therapist can compare and contrast notes to see if progress is being made.

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figlover | Student , Undergraduate | Honors

Posted April 11, 2010 at 6:40 PM (Answer #6)

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When therapies are used on kids, I like the idea of using "symptom" checklists by the parents to see if symptoms over a given period of time are reduced.

They are also using brain scans (see work of Dr. Daniel Amen) to detect changes in the brains of people with a variety of issues...including mental health. I remember reading something by Dr. Amen in which he mentioned how the brain scan of Kip Kinkel (teen school shooter) was, I believe, the most damaged teen brain he'd ever seen. So repeated brain scans (with treatment) on kids like Kinkel should show improvement.

How about the adults?

Do you think they can be objective in checking their symptoms?

Also, i saw a video of asking psychologists whether their are any ways to see whether the therapy was successful or not, and all of them said no, there is not blood testing of genetic testing to prove that the patients are cured.

And, how was the brain of kip kinkel the most damaged? I mean in what ways? I was wondering whether there were any ways to nsee or have concrete proof of curing malancholoy, depression, eating disorders.

 

Thanx for your insights!

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted April 12, 2010 at 9:10 AM (Answer #7)

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When dealing with illnesses and disorders of the mind, there is just too much we do not understand, and no one size fits all treatment.  So how do we gauge effectiveness?  On a case by case basis.  Some medication works great for one person, and not for others, some need larger doses, some less, some need a combination of drugs.

Clinical therapy has become much more refined (take how we now deal with PTSD, which is much, much better than in past years) and overall, more effective, but again, varies depending on the person and the disorder or illness you're dealing with.

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted April 12, 2010 at 3:06 PM (Answer #8)

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To add to post number 7 I have seen in kids where medication works great for a period of time and then all of a sudden it just seems to stop working. It seems to be a constant battle fro parents and doctors to keep the medication at an optimal level.

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booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted April 12, 2010 at 10:03 PM (Answer #9)

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To #6...I'm not sure if adults can be objective about their own symptoms. To a certain degree, perhaps. And maybe for some disorders more than others?

Look at Dr. Amen's research using SPECT scans. Or do a google search for Dr. Amen and Kip Kinkel. Dr. Amen is a psychiatrist who believes that, like every other medical doctor, psychiatrists should actually look at the part of the body they are treating...the brain. He can look at a SPECT scan and tell you what mental health condition the person probably has without seeing the patient. Fascinating stuff. If I remember correctly, Kip Kinkel's brain was just full of holes. But you'd have to do further research to check that.

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ako6777 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted June 15, 2010 at 11:43 AM (Answer #10)

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Controlled studies have been conducted using different therapy techniques and their effectiveness have been evaluated.  Basic observation of the patient's interpersonal and intrapersonal skills have been observed as well as, rating scale usage, and brain scans.  Using these evaluation tools, therapies have been proven successful. 

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tarsh | Student , Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted May 5, 2012 at 5:35 PM (Answer #11)

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list the medications for mental illnesses

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