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What is the meaning of "freedom is the freedom to say that two and two makes four. If...

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aeiou1234 | Student, Undergraduate | eNoter

Posted July 11, 2013 at 3:24 PM via iOS

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What is the meaning of "freedom is the freedom to say that two and two makes four. If its granted , all else follows" in 1984 by George Orwell.

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handbooktoliterature | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted July 11, 2013 at 8:09 PM (Answer #1)

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In the novel, the government has complete control and may censor anything it likes. The government decides what is true, and if it feels, it may change what is true and make sure all believe their new truth has always been true.

Take Winston's job at the Ministry of Truth. His job to go through documents and edit or change documents to match the current version of truth according to the government. Winston also knows that going against these accepted "truths" may mean disappearing without a trace. Therefore, if the government says 2+2=5, than it is true. Even if an individual knows it to be incorrect, he or she must accept it as true. For example, Winston starts to realize more and more that things  put out by Big Brother are falsehoods and brazen lies, but he does not have the freedom to deny their claims, let alone protest against them.

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