In Lord of the Flies, how does the motif of blood contribute to the overall theme of the loss of innocence?Please if possible, include citations! Thank you.!

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The motif of blood is closely connected to the boys' descent into savagery. For, after donning war paint, Jack leads the hunters in a search for wild pigs. When a sow runs past him in Chapter Eight, Jack manages to stun it and "vivid blood" drops on the grass. The hunters follow the trail of blood, until, finally, the sow collapses from the heat where she has screamed and staggered, the air "full of sweat and noise and blood and terror." The sadistic Roger sticks his spear into the sow while Jack finds the throat, and "the hot blood " spouts over his pants."

While the hunters chase the sow, Simon encounters the Lord of the Flies on the mountain. There the bloody head tells Simon the mystic, "You knew, didn't you?" and poor Simon collapses from the seizure that this sight has brought on. After the death of the sow, there are clear parallels with the death of Simon, as he descends from the clearing to tell the others that the beast is not the dead body, but something inside them. However, the hunters have worked themselves into such a sadistic frenzy that they at first mistake him for a pig as he enters their circle. 

Again, the hunters gather around one-by-one, chanting "kill the beast, cut his throat!" as Simon fights for his life, shouting about the "beast who floats above them. The boys yell and shout and Simon struggles, crying out about a man who is soon to come. As the rain falls on the sand, a desperate Simon has died. With his death, there is a death to all the innocence of the boys. These sadistic creatures, such as Robert, who will soon worship at the temple of the lord of the flies, revel in violence and death by violence, bludgeoning Simon to death, destroying his beauty and innocence.



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