Look around in your workplace,be it hospital,government,or any other large business,are there many minority workers ileadership postion. why, why not.

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brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

In my situation, I teach at a public high school in central Washington State.  It has approximately 900 students, of which 43% are Latino.  99% of our students are either Latino or Caucasian or a mix of the two, so we are pretty much bi-cultural.

After some quick research, I found that of the Administration, 0% is Latino, 100% Caucasian.  Of the teaching staff 5% is Latino, 95% Caucasian.  Of the support staff, custodians, receptionists, security and teachers' aides, 60% are Latino.  In terms of upper level management of my government institution, we're not very representative of the population we serve.

missy575's profile pic

missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

My principal is 100% Asian. Our school is 98% white, as is the entire staff (except for the principal). This man is a man I have known for years and once upon a time had him as a peer teacher. He worked hard and built rapport with teachers, administrators and students alike. He is very  well respected.

I believe he was hired and put into the position he has not at all because he is a minority but because of his skills. I think people who discriminate based on race are indeed in error, but to put someone in a position because they are a minority (and not necessarily skilled enough) is just as wrong.

In the US today, we have more minorities in positions of authority than ever. Within 50 years, with the rate at which minorities reproduce as opposed to whites, minorities will be the majority. This will no longer be a relevant issue.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

My example is a good example of why it is difficult to tell anything from individuals' experiences.

My school district is very heavily Hispanic -- like 70% of the students are.  But in the administration there are no Hispanics.  It is a small district so the administration consists of a superintendent and three principals for the whole district.

So what does this prove?  Why does it happen?  It is hard to say.  Much of the Hispanic population is first generation and not highly educated.  This makes it very unlikely that they would be represented in administration.  Are there whites who don't like the Mexicans?  Sure.  Is that why there are no Hispanics in administration?  Much harder to say if that is the case.

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