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A letter to the editor about global warming?A letter to the editor about global warming?

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bradytuohimaa | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted June 25, 2012 at 4:08 AM via web

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A letter to the editor about global warming?

A letter to the editor about global warming?

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wordprof | College Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted June 6, 2012 at 1:15 AM (Answer #2)

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The two disparate elements here--a phenomenal event and a forum for addressing an opinion or suggestion to a public readership--sort of clash, because global warming is not receptive to private opinion; if the writer wanted to contest that there was or wasn't such a thing as global warming, a letter to an editor would not be a proper forum--if it is merely an opinion, it is not editorial; if the reader brings some new  scientific evidence to the stale argument, a letter to an editor is not a large enough audience.  A letter to an editor is a fairly specific sociological communication with a fairly specific audience, and the purpose is to give a personal--but informed--point of view to an ongoing debate. Perhaps a local consequence of global warming, such as precipitation changes that affect local farmproduction, could be the subject of a letter to the editor.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 25, 2012 at 4:35 AM (Answer #3)

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I would think that the more likely content for such a letter to the editor would be about how to attack the problem.  There are many possible ways to try to reduce greenhouse gasses, each with its own pros and cons.  So I would suggest that you give your opinion as to what should be done to combat warming.

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bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted June 25, 2012 at 3:05 PM (Answer #4)

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I agree---a letter on what about global warming?  There are still debates going on whether global warming in fact exists or not.  If it does exist, what created it?  How can it effectively be reduced, or even eliminated?  You must determine the direction your address will take.

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted June 25, 2012 at 9:02 PM (Answer #5)

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First of all, let's get the terminology straight - no one in the sciences uses the term "global warming" any more, it's correctly referred to as "climate change". This immediately addresses the contention alluded to in #4 that it's not happening; pretty much everyone agrees that the climate IS changing. However, there's still a lot of disagreement about the cause of it. Is it natural? Or is it being caused by human activity? Before you can write a letter to the editor, you need to decide which of those two ideas you want to support.

If you are going to argue that climate change is natural, then a logical thing to write about would be support for programs that help people to be prepared for difficult weather. If you are of the opinion that climate change is being either caused or accelerated by human activity, then your letter might be about programs that push people and industries to lower their carbon dioxide emissions.

 

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stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted June 25, 2012 at 10:57 PM (Answer #6)

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Post #5 offers some excellent clarification and suggestions regarding approaches that could be used in constructing your letter to the editor. If this letter is supposed to reflect your real-life location and circumstances, you might address a local business that appears to be contributing to the furthering of climate change in some way and make suggestions for actions to change this situation.

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rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted June 26, 2012 at 8:01 PM (Answer #7)

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An interesting letter to an editor might try to reference some of the science concerning climate change. We hear that it is being contested in the media, but we don't hear that the people challenging the idea of global warming are not usually climatologists. There is a false equivalence created in the media between experts and those who simply don't want to believe that climate change is a reality. So a good letter might try to present some of the evidence for climate change in a clear, cohesive way. 

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truthseekah | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted August 15, 2012 at 5:05 PM (Answer #8)

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An interesting letter to an editor might try to reference some of the science concerning climate change. We hear that it is being contested in the media, but we don't hear that the people challenging the idea of global warming are not usually climatologists. There is a false equivalence created in the media between experts and those who simply don't want to believe that climate change is a reality. So a good letter might try to present some of the evidence for climate change in a clear, cohesive way. 

I can see how this is the perception, however, there are many climatologists and other scientists who find fault with the research linking "global warming" and later "climate change" to human interaction.  Many of these same people are ostracized for having a decenting view from the status quo on this issue and many may be conditioned to follow suit out of fear.  The media selectively uses those with little or no science background vs. scientists or an obviously biased perspective against an "unbiased" scientist giving the illusion of credibility. 


Whether global warming/climate change is a product of humans, there is a good deal of propaganda on both sides of the issue.  There are those who are positioned to make trillions on green taxes, which should be factored into the discussion.

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jjrichardson | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted August 19, 2012 at 3:42 AM (Answer #9)

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Scientists track changes to the planet's temperature in many ways. Land-based weather stations and ocean buoys in every corner of the world monitor temperatures constantly.

Temperatures from the past left their traces in tree rings, coral reef and ice cores. When scientists look at all this evidence, they have a very clear picture of how the earth's temperature is changing.

As far back as the 1850s, a small number of weather stations around the world were compiling temperature records. These numbers grew during the 20th century and today there are thousands of land-based weather stations and ocean buoys in every corner of the world monitoring temperatures

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