In the Kite Runner, how does Amir plan his framing of Hassan?Also how Amirs plan develops including the end result.

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gekkolies | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

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Amir is always in competition with Hassan for Baba's approval.  Amir plans his framing of Hassan by first lying to his father in Chapter 8.  Upon Hassan's disappearance, Amir claims, "He's got a cold or something."  Amir was haunted by the incident of Hassan's rape. His feelings of shame and guilt caused him to get headaches.   A long time passed, and Amir asked his father if he wanted new servants, and to get rid of Hassan and his father.  Baba says no.  As a result, Amir devises a new plot.  That is, to plant the watch that Baba had given him, along with some money, under Hassan's mattress.  Later, Amir conveniently found the goods where he had hid them, and blamed Hassan.  This caused Hassan and his father to leave the house.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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Each day following Hassan's rape and Amir's lack of intervention makes Amir pull further and further away from Hassan.  He won't talk with him or even look him in the eye.  Hassan still tries to get him to play and serves him, but Amir rejects him and keeps to himself.  His guilt continues to eat him up inside and he is even more angry that he was put into a position that and him have to make "a coward's choice." 

Amir puts his watch and some money in Hassan's bed.  He then tells Baba that someone stole his money and it might be Hassan.  When they look for the money it is uncovered.  To Amir's aggravation Baba says that he forgives Hassan.  Amir is confused because Baba has always taught him that to steal something is very wrong.  He becomes even more jealous.  However, Ali, Hassan's father, and Hassan leave and move away following the issue.  Hassan does not tell the truth and is just quiet.  He had to have known that Amir set him up.  Yet, he continued to love and write him years later.

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