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Provide 10 specific references from To Kill a Mockingbird that describe Boo Radley's...

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jenn-jebn | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 6, 2013 at 1:57 AM via iOS

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Provide 10 specific references from To Kill a Mockingbird that describe Boo Radley's house (with chapters).

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted November 6, 2013 at 2:56 AM (Answer #1)

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10 REFERENCES FROM CHAPTER 1.  There are repeated references to the Radley house in Chapter 1 of To Kill a Mockingbird. It is first mentioned as being "three doors to the south" of the Finch house; then the reader learns that the house is "inhabited by an unknown entity." From the midway point of the chapter, most of the narrative is centered around the Radley Place. Once a fine home, it is suffering from time and neglect. The house is described in depth, with its faded white paint, "green shutters," and drooping "rain-rotted shingles." The Radleys are particularly antisocial on the Sabbath: "The shutters and doors of the Radley house were closed on Sundays." Unlike most homes in Maycomb, "The Radley house had no screen doors." Arthur Jr. is last seen in public after stabbing his father. When the sheriff came to arrest him, "he found Boo sitting in the livingroom, cutting up the Tribune." Jem wonders what could keep Boo from ever leaving the house, believing that "Mr. Radley kept him chained to the bed most of the time." Scout remembers seeing Mrs. Radley watering her cannas "from the edge of the porch." People in Maycomb believed that "From the day Mr. Radley took Arthur home... the house died." At the end of the chapter, the children decide a raid on the Radley house is necessary. Dill bets that "Jem wouldn't get any farther than the Radley gate." Jem takes the bet, runs past the gate and slaps the house itself. "The old house was the same, droopy and sick..."      

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