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In Julius Caesar, Act I, why are the workers celebrating at the end of Scene 1, and why...

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chybell92 | eNoter

Posted May 20, 2011 at 4:41 AM via web

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In Julius Caesar, Act I, why are the workers celebrating at the end of Scene 1, and why does Marullus scold them?

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hilahmarca | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted July 21, 2011 at 4:26 PM (Answer #1)

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Before the play begins, Rome is ruled by a triumvirate (3 people who rule the country).  Two-thirds of the triumvirate consisted of Caesar and Pompey.  However, these two clashed which started a Civil War.  As the book begins, Caesar is being welcomed home with a parade celebrating his victory over Pompey.  The workers line the streets to pay tribute to Caesar.  Murellus is a tribune (soldier).  His loyalties lie with Pompey and he chides the common workers for cheering the fact that a great Roman has died.  He tries to remind them that they all once gathered together in support of Pompey, but their fickle ways have caused them to align with the evil frontrunner.  The workers brush him off figuring he's just a grumpy guy; Flavius and Murellus shows us that Rome is still a country divided and that there exists a faction who is unhappy with the additional power Caesar has obtained.

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