Industrial Revolution How did women's roles change during this time period?  

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e-martin's profile pic

Posted on

Tycoons are wealthy people who start, run and own large businesses and/or corporations.

Muckrakers are people who stir up "muck" and tell stories news stories meant to reveal a dirty truth, often about powerful figures and businesses.

litteacher8's profile pic

Posted on

I agree with the above. If you were poor, everyone in the family worked. Some women worked as household staff. These women were of the lower classes. Men and boys worked in factories. However, young women and children also did work in factories.
rrteacher's profile pic

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I completely agree with the preceding post, but would emphasize the line "those women who did not work in factories." The Victorian ideal that women should not leave the home to work was only the case for the middle classes. In the days of the early Industrial Revolution in England, working class women, who may have worked in their homes as spinners, worked in textile mills where their work was mechanized and increasingly disciplined. Like men, their time no longer belonged to them.

pohnpei397's profile pic

Posted on

Women became much less economically important during this time.  Before the revolution, women had helped economically by doing things like raising chickens and vegetables on a family farm.  This made them economically valuable and important.  After the industrial revolution, those women who did not work in factories were no longer involved in work that was economically valuable to their families.  This reduced their status in society.

chelsea492's profile pic

Posted on

I completely agree with the preceding post, but would emphasize the line "those women who did not work in factories." The Victorian ideal that women should not leave the home to work was only the case for the middle classes. In the days of the early Industrial Revolution in England, working class women, who may have worked in their homes as spinners, worked in textile mills where their work was mechanized and increasingly disciplined. Like men, their time no longer belonged to them.

thankss 4 the answer. i appreciate it.

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