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The idea for the League of Nations came from U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, but what...

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yoyo1998 | Student, Grade 9 | Honors

Posted March 10, 2013 at 3:16 PM via web

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The idea for the League of Nations came from U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, but what ultimately became America’s stance regarding the League Of Nations?

 

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 10, 2013 at 3:22 PM (Answer #1)

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The final official stance of the United States was that it would not join the League of Nations.  It is true that President Wilson first proposed the League, but presidents cannot commit the US to membership in such organizations on their own.  When a treaty is needed to join an organization, the Senate must confirm that treaty.  The Senate in this case did not confirm the treaty and the US never joined the League of Nations.

The main reason for this was a fear that the US would lose its sovereignty.  Many in the Senate feared that membership in the League of Nations would force the United States to enter wars that were not in its national interest.  They wanted to be sure that the US would be able to opt out of any wars that the League of Nations declared.  President Wilson did not want to allow any modifications to the treaty.  For this reason, he refused to accommodate the wishes of these senators and the treaty was never ratified.  This is why the US did not end up participating in the League of Nations even though it was Wilson’s brainchild.

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moustacio | TA , Undergraduate | Valedictorian

Posted June 30, 2014 at 4:53 PM (Answer #2)

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While President Wilson was the one who advocated for the creation of the League of Nations, he was unable to get the Senate to pass the resolution required for the Americans to join the organisation as a member. This was largely attributed to the fact that the American foreign policy then was steeped greatly in isolationism - the Americans had no desire to involve themselves in affairs on the European continent, since it only slowed down their economic growth and development, bringing with them little benefits.

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