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How is the website "Hatshepsut and Thutmose: a royal feud?" on bbc.co.uk reliable and...

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polly123456 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted June 22, 2013 at 5:27 AM via web

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How is the website "Hatshepsut and Thutmose: a royal feud?" on bbc.co.uk reliable and useful as a source of information?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/egyptians/hatshepsut_01.shtml

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 22, 2013 at 5:40 AM (Answer #1)

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If you are doing a report on Hatshepsut, this is clearly a useful and reliable source of information.

The article that you have linked to is useful largely because of the fact that it is quite long.  Any article that long is going to have a good amount of information about the topic.  In this article, for example, we see an explanation of why Hatshepsut did not engage in many military campaigns (because Egypt was strong enough that not many enemies wanted to challenge it).  As another example, we see a very good discussion of why we can tell that Hatshepsut must not have been a terrible queen.  The author points out that she did not kill her stepson nor did she even try to use her power to depose him.  In addition, she clearly maintained support among the ruling elite.  These sorts of arguments are very useful in thinking about what sort of a queen Hatshepsut was.

As for reliability, there are two main reasons to believe that this is a reliable source.  First of all, the BBC is a reputable source of educational material.  It is not some website that simply posts whatever someone decides to write on a topic.  Second, and perhaps more importantly, we see at the end of the article a statement of the author’s qualifications.  Since she teaches Egyptology at a major university, she is clearly a reliable source about ancient Egypt.

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