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How is the outcome of Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game" a type of foreshadowing?

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estebanjv | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted August 26, 2013 at 10:54 AM via iOS

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How is the outcome of Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game" a type of foreshadowing?

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tinicraw | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted August 28, 2013 at 6:13 PM (Answer #1)

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Richard Connell applies a slightly ambiguous ending of his hunting story, "The Most Dangerous Game" in order to achieve a high sense of intensity. The final battle between Zaroff and Rainsford is not clearly detailed with descriptions of thrusts or blows, which produces a few plot holes for the reader to fill in on his/her own. The reader, therefore, must use the clues to figure out a logical ending. Up until Rainsford is actually hunted by Zaroff, for instance, he is against murder or hunting humans. However, after being placed in a situation where he is actually hunted by another man, his attitude seems to change. As a dynamic character, Rainsford turns from being the hunted to the hunter. With that knowledge of Rainsford's inner transformation, one can only assume that by the time it was all over, Rainsford would kill Zaroff and spend the night in the hunter's bed. The question remains, "What will Rainsford do from that point on?" If the ending is a foreshadowing of anything, it is the fact that Rainsford would be a different man from the time before finding himself hunted on that island. He probably won't go on hunting other people, though. If he remains on the island, it is highly possible that he would save stranded people rather than hunt them; but, he was not one to just roll over and be hunted.

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