How is neurogenesis differentiated from non-neural cell proliferation?Recent evidence suggests that in some parts of the brain, the ability to grow new neurons is retained after birth. Increased...

How is neurogenesis differentiated from non-neural cell proliferation?

Recent evidence suggests that in some parts of the brain, the ability to grow new neurons is retained after birth. Increased understanding of this late neurogenesis may provide new treatments to people with spinal and brain damage.

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Well, the largest difference is the type of cells that are being generated.  These are nerve cells, which are capable of delivering incoming stimuli, processing the stimuli, matching the stimuli up to existing learned examples of stimuli, calculating an appropriate response, and delivering the desired approprate response. That is not to say all the other non-neural cells in the body are not important, but some cells possess a certain hierarchy in importance.  The brain and the spinal cord represent the central nervous system, which is responsible for all life processes, responsible for all incoming information, processing of that information, and delivering an appropriate response.  If that office closes, the rest of the body closes, or shuts down, one system at a time.  Another difference is it was once thought neual cells of this type could not be generated in the way other body cells were generated, so any destruction or natural atrophy was irreplaceable.

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