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How is life like a clock?  

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superking98 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted April 16, 2013 at 8:36 PM via web

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How is life like a clock?

 

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 16, 2013 at 8:54 PM (Answer #1)

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Comparing life to a clock is a simile.  Each day starts and ends, and starts over, like a clock.

There are several ways life is like a clock.  This is a simile, which is an indirect comparison because it uses the word “like” to compare to dissimilar things, “life” and “clock.”

First of all, we often refer to the “circle of life.”  This is the idea that we are born, and we die, but something else is born to take our place.  The clock does the same thing.  An hour starts, and ends, and another hour starts—also in a circle.  We also wake up, go through our day, and go to sleep, and start over-just like on the clock.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted April 18, 2013 at 2:38 AM (Answer #2)

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While there is a certain reality to time, the measure of time, a clock, is a man-made creation. "Time is an illusion," declared Albert Einstein.

So, within the created limitations of time, man sets his own boundaries, defining his life in quarters, just as a clock has its time measured in fourths.  The first quarter of life is childhood, the second is young adulthood, the third mature adulthood, and the fourth is old age.  

There is a measured amount of time in each quarter--fifteen minutes on a clock--and a person must make of this time what he/she will. Once this quarter is past, there is no turning back the hands of the clock or the time in one's life. 

Unfortunately, the clock is ticking, the hours are going by. The past increases, the future recedes. Possibilities decreasing, regrets mounting.
― Haruki MurakamiDance Dance Dance


Many a work of literature has been written about time. One famous poem, Robert Herrick's "To the Virgins to Make the Most of Time," urges young women to make the most of their youth

That Age is best which is the first,
When Youth and Blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst,
Then be not coy, but use your time....

Time, like life, also does not stop for anyone. For this reason, each hour of one's life is valuable, the poets urge.

 

 

 

 


 

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