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How is Krebs an example of an antihero in "Soldier's Home"?

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ohoodgamal | Student, Grade 11 | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 1, 2008 at 2:11 AM via web

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How is Krebs an example of an antihero in "Soldier's Home"?

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hadley818 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted September 1, 2010 at 11:46 AM (Answer #1)

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Krebs is an antihero because he does not have the traditional heroic qualities such as self-sacrifice, charisma, and purpose. He is selfish, listless, reserved, and lacking direction in life. He is a member of the "Lost Generation"--the generation that was haunted by World War I. Krebs seems lost in his own thoughts, and spends his days looking at pretty girls, going to the pool hall, and reading about the battles he was in. He is not sure of his role in the war, and he is not sure about his role in his family. He does not fit in.  Yes, he did demonstrate sacrifice by serving in the army, but after he comes home he seems selfish, and he says that he doesn't love anyone, not even his mother. Krebs is not the good-looking, all-American hero that gets the girls; he is disillusioned about life and uncertain of his future.

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pardonmyswag | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted November 10, 2008 at 7:51 AM (Answer #2)

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The classical hero, as we all know, represents a set of values of his time. A true classical American hero upholds basic American values such as Christianity, family, society, army since America was formed by Protestants therefore the Puritan mentality makes the American value system. On the other hand, an anti-hero represents the values that he REJECTS or rebels against. An anti-hero is more individual. Therefore, in some cases, the anti-hero forms his own values or he gets totally drafted away. Not being able to fit in, the anti-hero brings about his assimilation to old him. Just like Krebbs....

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