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How has Stacey grown by the end of Chapter 5 or Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry?

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alasak2 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 3, 2012 at 12:59 PM via web

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How has Stacey grown by the end of Chapter 5 or Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 2) Distinguished Educator

Posted May 31, 2012 at 8:06 AM (Answer #1)

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In Chapter 5 of Rolling Thunder, Hear My Cry, Stacey and his sister accompany Big Ma to Strawberry because she must take T.J. Avery as a favor to his father.  Big Ma has the grandchildren accompany her in order to be with T.J., whom she finds most irritating.  Once there, while Big Ma tries to sell her milk and eggs, Cassie and Stacey accompany T. J. into the Barnett Mercantile.  But Stacey is uncomfortable in the store and backs away from the counter where T.J. shows them a gun in the glass case. 

T. J. hands Mr. Barnett a list of things his mother wants, but Cassie notices that Mr. Barnett waits upon white people when they come in, dismisses the children as "Jus' them." But, when other white people enter and Mr. Barnett hurries to wait on them, Cassie becomes angered that they have been ignored and marches over to Mr. Barnett, saying politely,

"I think you forgot, but you was waiting on us 'fore you was waiting on this girl here, and we been waiting a good while now for you to get back."

When Mr. Barnett rebuffs Cassie, she retorts, "....And, it ain't fair.  You got not right--" But, Mr. Barnett cuts her short, asking to whom Cassie belongs.  Soon, Stacey steps up, saying,

"Come on, Cassi, let's get out of here."

But, before he can get Cassie out of the door, Mr. Barnett chides him, telling him to be certain that she does not return until she is taught "what she is." Then, Stacey jerks the girl before him into the street.  Cassie jerks away her hand telling Stacey, "You know he was wrong."  Stacey replies,

"I know it and you know it, but he don't know it, and that's where the trouble is."

Still angry, Stacey crosses the street "sullenly, then, his hands jammed in his pockets." Like his sister, Stacey is filled with rage at the treatment of his sister, both in the store and in public. But, unlike his sister, Stacey is not demonstrative; he knows that he must pretend.

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