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How is Hamlet a typical renaissance prince?

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arrogant | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 17, 2008 at 1:09 AM via web

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How is Hamlet a typical renaissance prince?

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luannw | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted January 17, 2008 at 10:44 PM (Answer #1)

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Remember that the Renaissance was fairly young when Shakespeare wrote Hamlet and there were no clearly defined rules for what was considered "typical".  Hamlet, however, is different from Fortinbras and Laertes who are quick to action and have a "Damn the torpedos, full speed ahead" attitude where they tend to act first, then think.  Hamlet is just the opposite, in fact.  Hamlet thinks all the time, too much probably.  Also, Hamlet is a very well-educated and intelligent prince, another quality that makes him more Renaissance-like than Fortinbras and Laertes.  Hamlet is still a man of action when action is called for immediately such as he proved when he fought the pirates as he describes in the letter to Horatio in Act 4, sc. 6.  Hamlet also questions the world around himself.  He ponders on philosophical matters, especially in his soliloquies, such as the meaning of life, what motivates people, and so on. Hamlet does not readily accept the fact that the ghost of his father is truly his father's spirit, either.  Even though at first he says "It is an honest ghost" (Act1, sc. 5), he later decides he must perform a test to see if the ghost was real or a demon meant to lead him astray.

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linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted January 18, 2008 at 12:23 AM (Answer #2)

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Prior to the Renaissance, the job description of a prince would include learn to rule, learn to lead an army, learn to be a bishop if you were a younger son, and that was pretty much it. During and after the Renaissance, education and learning became important. Here are some of Hamlet's characteristics that made him a Renaissance man:

  • He is pursuing a college education at Wittenburg, which indicates his desire for knowledge and may hint that he was Protestant, unlike his Catholic forefathers.
  • He holds to the humanist philosophy of the extraordinary value of the human mind: "What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties" (2.2.311).
  • He uses investigative techniques to draw Claudius out as the killer of his father with the play-within-a-play.
  • He makes reference to classical Greek history and culture, as when he says while holding Yorick's skull, “Dost thou think Alexander look'd o' this fashion i' th' earth?” (5.1.191-92).
  • Before the Renaissance, it was common for a prince to be destined to become king after his father. During and after the Renaissance, the man who became king was the one who could gain and maintain the people's favor.

See the sites linked below for more information, especially Machiavelli's description of the perfect prince.

 

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